data point

Texas named a top state for businesses to survive the pandemic

The Lone Star State's mix of rural and urban settings — and other factors — has set it up for success as the economy reels from the COVID-19 pandemic. Photo by gguy44/Getty Images

A new study has found that businesses in Texas are in a good position to weather the storm that is the COVID-19 pandemic and subsequent economic challenges.

The FitSmallBusiness.com ranking factored in various metrics from overall financial health and emergency reserves to even how consumers feel about their state's ability to bounce back. The researchers weighted five metrics: Economic and financial Health (20 percent); least economic stressors (25 percent); emergency reserves and relief (25 percent); COVID-19 rates and health care infrastructure (20 percent); and consumer confidence (10 percent).

Based on the analysis, Texas ranked as the third best state equipped to survive the economic fallout from COVID-19. Texas ranked No. 1 in the study's emergency reserves and relief category, since the Lone Star State has the second-highest CARES Act endowment at over $10 billion.

"The state also possesses adequate economic reserves and offers decent compensation for the unemployed. When these factors are combined with a relatively low cost of living and what is considered to be a pro-business environment, Texas just might be 'the case study for economic recovery from the COVID-19 recession,'" the report reads.

In contrast, New York is ranked at the bottom of the list at No. 50 due to its disproportionate amount of cases and high density in New York City. The top 10 states are as follows:

  1. Ohio
  2. South Dakota
  3. Texas
  4. Wyoming
  5. New Mexico
  6. Arkansas
  7. Iowa
  8. Utah
  9. West Virginia
  10. Nebraska

Midwestern states did particularly well in the report due to their low density and lack of tourism. Texas too shares these elements, as well as boasting a balance between city and rural environments. Even though Texas is the second-most populous state in the United States, it ranks as No. 24 for density. The Lone Star State's economy was factored in as well with it having the second largest economy by GDP in the U.S. Plus, the state's economy represents a variety of industries — like agriculture, aeronautics, and computer technology.

"So while the state has indeed taken its share of bumps from the current recession, it seems that it has enough resources to weather the storm," according to the report.

The study, which was published June 22, used data that came from sources such as the U.S. Department of Labor, Moody's Analytics, the U.S. Census, the Tax Foundation, the New York Times, and the Center on Budget and Policy Priorities.

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Building Houston

 
 

Nancy and Rich Kinder gifted $50M to their eponymous center. Photo courtesy

Houston’s most generous couple has once again gifted a massive sum to a local institution. Rich and Nancy Kinder’s Kinder Foundation has donated $50 million to Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, the organization announced.

The Kinder's generous grant will assist the institute’s focus on what it dubs “inclusive prosperity” — that is, “ensuring that everyone can contribute to Houston's success and share in its opportunities.”

This new grant follows the approximately $30 million he Kinder Foundation previously gifted Rice’s Kinder Institute and its affiliates to facilitate its headquarters.

“Over the past decade, the Kinder Institute has played an integral role in shaping Houston,” said Rich Kinder, chairman of the Kinder Foundation. “However, we can do more to inform and more directly address the challenges our communities face, particularly in the areas of housing, education, economic mobility, health and population research.”

To that end, the Kinders’ funds will ensure the institute can assist its partners regardless of their ability to pay for research. Funds will also help the institute respond to community research needs quickly during times of crisis — such as a catastrophic storm or pandemic — when funds aren’t readily available.

Kinder Institute director Ruth López Turley calls the grant “a gift to all of Houston,” speaking to the institute’s work to improve lives through data, research, engagement and action.

“Inclusive prosperity doesn’t just happen spontaneously,” she noted in a statement. “It requires an explicit effort informed by research. Lots of organizations are working hard to make things better, but most of them have very limited research capacity, and that’s what the Kinder Institute is primed to do.”

Founded in 2010, the institute has evolved into a leader in research, data, and policy analysis of critical issues such as housing, transportation, and education. The institute also releases the familiar Kinder Houston Area Survey, which charts significant changes in the way area residents perceive and understand Houston’s ongoing challenges and opportunities.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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