New to town

European software company plans first U.S. office in Houston

Cognite is opening two offices in Texas. Getty Images

When considering entering the United States market, Francois Laborie, general manager of Cognite North Americas, of course considered some of the obvious cities for a regional headquarters.

"Initially, when we talked about the US, people assumed Silicon Valley or Boston, because we are a traditional software company," Laborie says. "But we really didn't consider too long because the customers we work with require a pretty deep understanding of industry."

The Norway-based company decided to bet on the energy capital of the world and has announced future offices in Houston as well as Austin — both to open by this summer. This will be Cognite's first expansion outside of Northern Europe. The company makes data software for industrial businesses — oil and gas being a huge focus, as is engineering, equipment manufacturing, shipping, and more.

"The industrial world is very siloed and closed, and we are changing a lot of things in that world," Laborie says. "In the digital world, data and information only becomes valuable as you share it. We are all about liberating data, contextualizing it, and then drawing value out of it."

Laborie says the Houston office will be the company's energy hub — both current and prospective clients of Cognite have pressences in town. Meanwhile, Austin will be the tech hub, since the city has a large tech talent pool. Currently, Austin is on the path to be the U.S. headquarters, but nothing is set in stone at the moment, Laborie says.

Cognite, which expects around 50 employees (both new hires and relocations) split between the two locations, already has strategic Houston partnerships in place. Cognite will operate out of Station Houston and even has an internship program and partnership with Rice University. Overall, Laborie says the reception of the city has been positive.

"Houston went above and beyond," Laborie says. "The relationship with Rice has been very interesting because they are working closely with the Houston municipality to transform this image of Houston to get a stronger driver on innovation with the Innovation District, which spoke very loudly to us."

These partnerships are a crucial party of the company, Laborie says, and Cognite plans to work within Houston's innovation ecosystem to continue to push the envelope on innovative technologies.

"We have partnerships with large corporations, but we also see the importance to work with smaller companies to drive innovation — even if they aren't directly related," Laborie says.

Houston-based SnapStream, led by CEO Rakesh Agrawal, has been selected by Verizon to provide support. Courtesy of SnapStream

A Houston software company that enables TV and broadcast monitoring just snagged a deal with Verizon. The partnership will call for 10 new Houston employees.

Verizon Digital Media Services announced that SnapStream is the "official transition partner" for a product under Volicon Observer, a company that was acquired by Verizon in 2016. SnapStream's CEO Rakesh Agrawal says in a release that the two entities have similar products, features, and even customers, but have always had a respectful relationship.

"SnapStream is known, among other things, for the great support we provide, and we look forward to providing the same high-quality support to Volicon customers," Agrawal says in the release. "We hope to eventually earn the business of current Volicon customers by converting them into SnapStream customers."

SnapStream's technology has been used by hundreds of organizations around the world, the release says, including CBS, MLB Networks, the Daily Show, Last Week Tonight, Samantha Bee, and the U.S. Senate. While SnapStream is a software solution, Volicon is appliance based, and Verizon announced the termination of the company's solutions in January — citing the need "to focus continued development on future solutions that better align with industry trends and market needs."

Now, Volicon customers will be redirected to SnapStream support into 2020 and can transition into SnapStream's model should they like.

"Verizon Digital Media Services is committed to providing high-quality products and services for our customers," says Peter Gallagher, COO of Verizon Digital Media Services, in the release. "The partnership with SnapStream will provide Volicon Observer customers with a dedicated support team at the highest level of commitment to ensure continued success in their business operations."

SnapStream's technology is a TV broadcast monitoring software used by CBS, MLB, The Daily Show, and more.Courtesy of SnapStream