seeing green

Deloitte launches first-of-its-kind clean energy lab in Houston

The Houston location is one of six Greenhouses in the U.S. and one of 40 around the world. Photo courtesy of Deloitte

Houston will become home to professional services giant Deloitte's largest and most technologically advanced immersive, interactive innovation hub dubbed the Deloitte Greenhouse, Powered by Energy & Industrials.

Co-located with the company's downtown Houston headquarters, the 14,000-square-foot space is intended to help executives plant and foster new ways of thinking, working, and experimenting in the energy industry.

The Houston location is one of six Greenhouses in the U.S. and one of 40 around the world — take a virtual tour of a few of them here. This is the first Greenhouse in Texas (other U.S. locations include Chicago, New York, San Jose, and Washington D.C.) and the first to focus on the energy transition.

"Houston, the world's energy capital, is the ideal location for this type of innovative approach to accelerate problem-solving," says Amy Chronis, Houston managing partner, Deloitte LLP. "The oil and gas industry is at a crossroads where business transformation is no longer an option. We are providing a controlled, safe environment for companies to experiment and test various workforce, technology and market scenarios to help them right-size and future-proof their businesses in this rapidly changing landscape."

The space is designed with touchscreen-enabled and collaborative technology tools to "help ideate, co-create and prototype solutions to the toughest challenges facing the industry," including a 360-degree immersion dome.

It's also slated to include AR technology and computer vision algorithmic solutions that have become a focus for crews working in remote, high-risk environments, especially during the pandemic.

"New realities and expectations are driving the demand for new thinking," says Stanley Porter, vice chair and U.S. energy, resources and industrials leader at Deloitte. "At Deloitte, we are committed to and we are investing in the Deloitte Greenhouse, Powered by Energy & Industrials to accelerate learning and enable rapid solutions to help our clients solve their most complex problems and co-create their future."

Other global leaders have launched incubators in Houston that focus on the shift to lower carbon energy in recent months. Halliburton's in-house incubator launched last year and recently announced new startups that are teaming up with the lab. Meanwhile, Greentown Labs, opened earlier this year.

The space is designed with touchscreen-enabled and collaborative technology tools. Photo courtesy of Deloitte

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Building Houston

 
 

"The Soccer Innovation Institute presents the ultimate opportunity to redefine the player and fan experience, and develop a lasting legacy for the long-term benefit of the FIFA World Cup." Photo via Paul Duron/Wikipedia

Houston is kicking up its 2026 FIFA World Cup bid by a notch or two with a new innovative initiative.

The Houston 2026 World Cup Bid Committee on October 14 committed to establishing the nonprofit Soccer Innovation Institute if Houston becomes a host city for the FIFA World Cup.

"The institute will rely on Houston's spirit of innovation to create a united community investment in building a legacy that goes well beyond the city," according to a news release announcing the potential formation of the nonprofit.

The soccer institute, made up of a network of experts and leaders from various global organizations, would conduct specialized think tanks and would support a series of community programs.

"As the energy capital of the world, the global leader in medicine, the universal headquarters for NASA, and the home to numerous sports tech companies, Houston has an abundance of resources that are unmatched by other cities," Houston billionaire John Arnold, chairman of the 2026 bid committee, says in a news release. "By bringing these organizations together under one umbrella, the Soccer Innovation Institute presents the ultimate opportunity to redefine the player and fan experience, and develop a lasting legacy for the long-term benefit of the FIFA World Cup."

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says the institute would align with the city's efforts to build a strong ecosystem for innovation, along with its passion for soccer.

"Houston is recognized as a leader in technology and innovation. We have many innovation hubs around the city that bring bright minds into collaborative spaces where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts," the mayor says.

Held every four years, the World Cup assembles national men's soccer teams from around the world in one of the most planet's most watched sporting events. The traditional 32-team tournament will expand to 48 teams in 2026. After 2026, the World Cup might be staged every two years.

Among those collaborating on the Houston 2026 bid are NRG, the Texas Medical Center, Shell, Chevron, the U.S. Soccer Foundation, the Council for Responsible Sport, the Houston Dynamo, the Houston Dash, the City of Houston, Harris County, and Houston First.

The FIFA World Cup 2026 will be played in 16 cities across the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. Houston and Dallas are among the 17 cities vying to become a U.S. host. A final decision is expected in the first half of 2022. If Houston is selected, it will host six World Cup games at NRG Stadium.

Between October 21 and November 1, World Cup delegates will visit eight cities in the running to be North American hosts: Houston, Dallas, Kansas City, Cincinnati, Denver, San Francisco, Seattle, and Monterrey, Mexico.

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