Guest column

Houston expert: Why tech companies can benefit from building an ambassador ecosystem

Tech companies located in Houston should consider creating ambassador programs to leverage the deep bench of talent and experience locally. Photo via Getty Images

Innovation isn't born in a vacuum nor is the adoption of a new technology. Often the broader path to tech disruption is through groundwork and that's a system best laid by a well-connected network.

The urban megaregion that spans from Austin to San Antonio and Houston to Dallas comprises the largest single regional economy in the world. Furthermore, it is projected to expand its population density 65 percent to an astounding 10 million in the next two decades. In recent years, Houston's reputation has earned numerous nods as a growing tech hub, with many local startups employing entrenched talent from the specialized sectors a startup serves — for example, the digitization of oil and gas or maritime shipping.

Invigorated by its depth of industries including energy, the medical complex, transportation, real estate and education, Houston and its nearby economies are home to a vibrant presence of spirited entrepreneurs and tech-focused universities that are expected to keep pace with much anticipated growth. With nearly 3,000 startups and as the hub of major industries including oil and gas, health care and aerospace among others, the cross-pollinating capabilities of the city is nearly unlimited. Tech companies located here should consider creating ambassador programs to leverage the deep bench of talent and experience in Houston, and tap networking capabilities to drive value and adoption of their offerings.

All changes start small

Ambassador programs undertake the formalization of relationships with respective influencers in target industries to develop deep understanding and engagements with a company's product or service. Depending on the aim, an ambassador program can function similarly to an executive referral program with underpinnings to educate, promote, connect and incentivize adoption.

While each company's process may be unique, the general outcomes of ambassadorship can be shared. According to HubSpot, 90 percent of individuals believe brand recommendations from friends, 70 percent trust recommendations from other consumers, while a reported 71 percent are likely to make purchases based on social media referrals. By providing independent validation, a company's ambassadors can synergistically generate instant credibility that proliferates as an ecosystem expands. And therein lies the magic.

The first step in implementing an ambassador program is to identify relevant industry-specific enthusiasts to form initial connections or tap existing individuals that are particularly helpful or influential. Then create ongoing educational initiatives and offer certifications that reflect company objectives; as a company scales, it's offerings to an ambassador audience should mature to accommodate the company's growth.

Ambassador programs are often built atop reward referral programs to further incentivize knowledge transfership within a community and to galvanize opportunities. With the quality and quantity of companies and industries in the Houston area, a robust intercompany ambassadorship presence can create an enriching environment, generating a breadth of advocates who can spread the word and play an integral role in achieving wider success for the company.

Value begets value

Collectively, startup culture has a history of competition but also of coopetition. While evangelizing tech solutions, the bigger play at hand for ambassadors is to create a robust network that embodies passion, positivity, adoption of valuable technology and the most critical aspect: community.

Change needs a channel to cut its new grooves on, and a knowledgeable ambassador network primed to mutually drive engagement and community around a startups' brand is one of the fastest methods to do just that while also building fruitful relationships for now and into the future.

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Andrew Bruce is the founder and CEO of Data Gumbo.

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Building Houston

 
 

Five companies have been selected for a brand new accelerator program in Houston. Image via Getty Images

A Houston medical technology organization has announced the inaugural cohort of a new early-stage accelerator.

M1 MedTech, launched this year by Houston-based Proxima Clinical Research, announced its Fall 2022 cohort.

“This initial cohort launches M1 MedTech with an interactive 14-week agenda covering the basics every emerging MedTech business needs to progress from a startup to an established solution in their market,” says Sean Bittner, director of programs at M1 MedTech, in a news release.

The accelerator will equip early-stage startups with storytelling, business plan support, investor connections, FDA guidance, research, and more through one-on-one consultations, workships, and in-kind services.

The first cohort includes five startups, per the release from the company:

  1. Linovasc. Providing a long overdue major update to balloon angioplasty devices in over 50 years, the Linovasc solution offers a safer branch occlusion and aortic stent dilatation using a toroidal balloon that expands the aorta uniformly without the ischemia caused by current treatments. The company is founded by Bruce Addis.
  2. Grapheton. Founded by Sam Kassegne and Bao Nguyen, Grapheton's patented carbon materials work with electrically active devices to improve the longevity and outcome of bioelectric implants in the body. Terry Lingren serves as the CEO of the startup.
    • Rhythio Medical. Founded by Kunal Shah and Savannah Esteve, Rhythio is the first preventative approach to heart arrhythmias.The chief medical officer is Dr. Mehdi Razavi.
      • PONS Technology. An AI cognitive functioning ultrasound device attempting to change the way ultrasound is done, PONS is founded by CEO: Soner Haci and CTO: Ilker Hacihaliloglu.
        • Vivifi Medical. Founded by CEO Tushar Sharma, Vivifi is the first suture-less laparoscopic technology that connects vessels to improve male infertility and benign prostatic hyperplasia. The company's senior R&D engineer is Frida Montoya.

          The program includes support from sponsors and experts from: Proxima Clinical Research, Greenlight Guru, Medrio, Galen Data, Merge Medical Device Studio, Venn Negotiation, Engagement PR & Marketing, Aleberry Creative, and others.

          “This is an amazing opportunity for emerging founders to learn the progression of pipelining their ideas through the FDA and absorb the critical strategies for success early in their business development,” says Isabella Schmitt, principal at M1 MedTech and director of regulatory affairs at Proxima CRO, in the release.

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