Prolific University of Houston professor wins prestigious $650,000 'genius' grant

UH's Cristina Rivera Garza is a 2020 MacArthur Fellowship winner. Photo courtesy of John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

A prolific fiction writer and award-winning University of Houston academic has just received a major accolade. Distinguished professor Cristina Rivera Garza has been awarded a 2020 MacArthur Fellowship — dubbed more casually as a "genius" grant of a hefty $625,000 — the university announced.

The grant is a no-strings-attached gift "to extraordinarily talented and creative individuals as an investment in their potential," according to the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, which awards the grants each year. Rivera Garza is one of just 21 nationwide individuals to receive the fellowship grant.

Rivera Garza is founder and director of the UH doctoral program in Hispanic Studies with a concentration in creative writing in Spanish.

"This is an incredible — and quite unexpected — honor. I am suddenly short of words," said Rivera Garza in a statement. Amusingly, Rivera Garza told Andrew Dansby of the Houston Chronicle that she didn't take the MacArthur call at first Tuesday morning because she didn't recognize the number. She received an email asking for information about another candidate. "So I finally answered, and they delivered the news. It was quite a shock," she said.

She joins Rick Lowe, a UH professor of art who earned the fellowship in 2014, as the two MacArthur Fellows on faculty at UH. MacArthur Fellowships are among the most prestigious and generous awards given to those who have demonstrated extraordinary talent and dedication in academia, writing, music, film, and other creative fields, UH notes.

The majority of Rivera Garza's creative works are in Spanish but were written in the United States, where she has lived for more than 30 years. She earned her doctorate in Latin American history from the University of Houston in 1995 and was awarded an honorary degree from UH in 2012, according to UH. Rivera Garza joined the University of Houston faculty in 2016 and founded UH's Spanish-language creative writing concentration in 2017. She leads the program as its director.

------

This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

For over a year now, scientists have been testing wastewater for COVID-19. Now, the public can access that information. Photo via Getty Images

In 2020, a group of researchers began testing Houston's wastewater to collect data to help identify trends at the community level. Now, the team's work has been rounded up to use as an online resource.

The Houston Health Department and Rice University launched the dashboard on September 22. The information comes from samples collected from the city's 39 wastewater treatment plants and many HISD schools.

"This new dashboard is another tool Houstonians can use to gauge the situation and make informed decisions to protect their families," says Dr. Loren Hopkins, chief environmental science officer for the health department and professor in the practice of statistics at Rice University, in a news release. "A high level of virus in your neighborhood's wastewater means virus is spreading locally and you should be even more stringent about masking up when visiting public places."

The health department, Houston Water, Rice University, and Baylor College of Medicine originally collaborated on the wastewater testing. Baylor microbiologist Dr. Anthony Maresso, director of BCM TAILOR Labs, led a part of the research.

"This is not Houston's first infectious disease crisis," Maresso says in an earlier news release. "Wastewater sampling was pioneered by Joseph Melnick, the first chair of Baylor's Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, to get ahead of polio outbreaks in Houston in the 1960s. This work essentially ushered in the field of environmental virology, and it began here at Baylor. TAILOR Labs is just continuing that tradition by providing advanced science measures to support local public health intervention."

It's an affordable way to track the virus, says experts. People with COVID-19 shed viral particles in their feces, according to the release, and by testing the wastewater, the health department can measure important infection rate changes.

The dashboard, which is accessible online now, is color-coded by the level of viral load in wastewater samples, as well as labeled with any recent trend changes. Houstonians can find the interactive COVID-19 wastewater monitoring dashboard, vaccination sites, testing sites, and more information at houstonemergency.org/covid19.

Trending News