Prolific University of Houston professor wins prestigious $650,000 'genius' grant

UH's Cristina Rivera Garza is a 2020 MacArthur Fellowship winner. Photo courtesy of John D. & Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation

A prolific fiction writer and award-winning University of Houston academic has just received a major accolade. Distinguished professor Cristina Rivera Garza has been awarded a 2020 MacArthur Fellowship — dubbed more casually as a "genius" grant of a hefty $625,000 — the university announced.

The grant is a no-strings-attached gift "to extraordinarily talented and creative individuals as an investment in their potential," according to the John D. and Catherine T. MacArthur Foundation, which awards the grants each year. Rivera Garza is one of just 21 nationwide individuals to receive the fellowship grant.

Rivera Garza is founder and director of the UH doctoral program in Hispanic Studies with a concentration in creative writing in Spanish.

"This is an incredible — and quite unexpected — honor. I am suddenly short of words," said Rivera Garza in a statement. Amusingly, Rivera Garza told Andrew Dansby of the Houston Chronicle that she didn't take the MacArthur call at first Tuesday morning because she didn't recognize the number. She received an email asking for information about another candidate. "So I finally answered, and they delivered the news. It was quite a shock," she said.

She joins Rick Lowe, a UH professor of art who earned the fellowship in 2014, as the two MacArthur Fellows on faculty at UH. MacArthur Fellowships are among the most prestigious and generous awards given to those who have demonstrated extraordinary talent and dedication in academia, writing, music, film, and other creative fields, UH notes.

The majority of Rivera Garza's creative works are in Spanish but were written in the United States, where she has lived for more than 30 years. She earned her doctorate in Latin American history from the University of Houston in 1995 and was awarded an honorary degree from UH in 2012, according to UH. Rivera Garza joined the University of Houston faculty in 2016 and founded UH's Spanish-language creative writing concentration in 2017. She leads the program as its director.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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