money moves

Fast-growing energy fintech startup raises $50M series B

The series B capital will allow the company to enhance its core product, while also adding on other workflows that focus on emissions and renewable energy. Image via combocurve.com

Houston-based ComboCurve announced today that it has raised $50 million through a series B funding round led by Dragoneer Investment Group and Bessemer Venture Partners.

Founded in 2017, the company is a cloud-based energy analytics and operating platform that uses sophisticated software to forecast and report on a company's energy assets, including renewables.

The series B capital will allow the company to enhance its core product, while also adding on other workflows that focus on emissions and renewable energy.

ComboCurve raised its series A less than six months ago, according to a release. The company was founded by Armand Paradis and Jeremy Gottlieb, who have backgrounds in engineering and finance, respectively.

“ComboCurve was created to solve critical pain points, helping energy companies better manage their forecasting, valuation, reporting and decision-making functions,” Paradis, who also serves as CEO, said in a statement. “Our solution has resulted in widespread adoption by many of the world’s leading energy companies, and this investment led by Dragoneer and Bessemer, two of the world’s leading technology investment firms, will enable us to engage with additional energy companies to operate more efficiently.”

Since the completion of the company's series A, ComboCurve has taken on more than 170 customers, including the likes of Devon Energy and Pioneer Natural Resources, according to ComboCurve's website.

The company describes its platform as a "supercharged Aries but easy to use," referring to the ARIES Petroleum Economic Software by Landmark Solutions, on LinkedIn. The platform provides forecast modules, workflows and fully integrated economics, with GHC and carbon reporting features in the works that will allow users to estimate future emissions.

“ComboCurve is in the early innings of building a truly enduring franchise that is rapidly becoming the software backbone of their customers’ day-to-day operations,” Christian Jensen, partner at Dragoneer Investment Group, said in a statement. “We are excited to partner with Armand and his world-class team as they continue to deepen their suite with existing customers and expand their platform into renewables, emissions reporting, and all corners of the energy market.”

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Building Houston

 
 

You can now hop online and invest in this promising cell therapy startup. Photo via Getty Images

A clinical-stage company headquartered in Houston has opened an online funding campaign.

FibroBiologics, which is developing fibroblast cell-based therapeutics for chronic diseases, launched a campaign with equity crowdfunding platform StartEngine. The platform lets anyone — regardless of their net worth or income level — to invest in securities issued by startups.

The funding, according to a press release, will be used to support ongoing operations of Fibrobiologics and advance its clinical programs in multiple sclerosis, degenerative disc disease, wound care, extension of life, and cancer.

"We're excited to partner with StartEngine on this campaign. StartEngine has over 600,000 investors as part of their community and has raised over half a billion dollars for its clients," says FibroBiologics' Founder and CEO Pete O'Heeron, in the release.

"This is an exciting time at FibroBiologics as we continue progressing our clinical pipeline and developing innovative therapies to treat chronic diseases," he continues. "This new funding will fuel our growth in the lab and bring us one step closer to commercialization."

The campaign, launched this week, already has over 100 investors, at the time of publication, and has raised nearly $2 million, according to the page. The minimum investment is set at around $500, and the company's indicated valuation is $252.57 million.

In 2021, FibroBiologics announced its intention of going public. Last year, O'Heeron told InnovationMap on the Houston Innovators Podcast of the company's growth plans as well as the specifics of the technology.

Only two types of cells — stem cells and fibroblasts — can be used in cell therapy for a regenerative treatment, which is when specialists take healthy cells from a patient and inject them into a part of the body that needs it the most. As O'Heeron explains in the podcast, fibroblasts can do it more effectively and cheaper than stem cells.

"(Fibroblasts) can essentially do everything a stem cell can do, only they can do it better," says O'Heeron. "We've done tests in the lab and we've seen them outperform stem cells by a low of 50 percent to a high of about 220 percent on different disease paths."


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