UV rays to save the day

Houston industrial tech company launches new products to sanitize shared spaces from COVID-19

A Houston real estate developer is making sure its common spaces are clean by using a new UV sanitation product from a Houston industrial services company. Photo via 255assay.com

A new technology coming out of a Houston industrial services company is allowing shared spaces to reopen safely amid the COVID-19 pandemic.

Apache Industrial Services has expanded its industrial services to include SafeSpace Solutions, a new line that includes UV-C products that minimize the risk of infection by detection and decontamination systems.

Houston-based real estate developer, McCord Development, has employed this new UV sanitation technology at its new apartment complex, 225 Assay, in Generation Park to sanitize high traffic areas such as elevators, amenities, retails spaces, and apartment units before move-ins.

"The new UV technology provides an extra level of comfort and peace of mind for employees and current residents," says Levi Hermes, director of development for McCord Development.McCord Development has two Tomahawk UV-C lamps that rely on ultralight technology to detect and destroy microorganisms in the air and on hard surfaces where the light touches. The light eradicates harmful pathogens and viruses in large open spaces with 99.9 percent effectiveness.

The Tomahawk lamp can be used in closed and open spaces, made out of lightweight carbon steel with a four-wheel stand, it is portable and easy to move. The light tower is remotely operated and leaves a burnt smell after the cleaning process is done.

"The ultimate goal of using the UV technology in our real estate is for our employees, customers, and our other partners that come into our different spaces," says Hermes. "We are doing everything the Center for Disease Control recommends including sanitizing high touch areas, but this adds an extra level of protection."

The lamp is easy to operate and can be moved to common areas and offices in commercial and apartment units quickly. McCord Development has used the UV lights in a variety of settings including industrial buildings, offices, and common areas in 255 Assay such as fitness centers, mailrooms, resident rooms, and a business center, which provide residents a place to socialize and work.

Apache Industrial Services, a McCord Development tenant, has already deployed other UV-related products including Airrow 2000 UV-C Air Treatment System, an air filtration and treatment system, Airrowswift 5000, placed in external A/C packages to filtrate air for small buildings.

Hermes and his team at McCord Development are looking forward to incorporating more gadgets as they become available, because of the heightened sanitation standards which they expect will continue even after society enters a new normal post-pandemic world.

"The long term impact will be monumental," says Hermes. "A lot of the current sanitation procedures will be here to stay. However, the pendulum will swing back to normal, but it will be a new normal. It will be important for owners of real estate to provide that extra level of comfort through sanitation."

Temperature checking

Photos via apacheip.com

Apache's Mass Temperature Screening System uses cameras to detect temperature and can scan 5,000 people in 30 minutes with great accuracy, according to the website.

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Moonflower Farms grows lettuce hydroponically. Courtesy of Moonflower Farms

A Houston urban farm has earned national recognition for its innovative approach to water conservation. Moonflower Farms won the American Heart Association's Foodscape Innovation Excellence Award, which recognizes positive changes in the foodscape, a term for all of the places where food is produced, purchased, or consumed.

The Heart Association selected Moonflower's submission, titled "Sustainable Farming Through Water Conservation," from 26 entries. Dallas' Restorative Farms earns the Foodscape Innovation Consumer Choice Award.

"These two innovations demonstrate a way of producing food that promotes affordability and equitable access, and the American Heart Association is proud to recognize these efforts," AHA chief medical officer for prevention Eduardo Sanchez said in a release.

Located in a 20,000-square-foot greenhouse south of downtown, Moonflower operates what it describes as Houston's first vertical indoor farm. The method both reduces the amount of space needed to grow the farm's microgreens, lettuces, herbs and edible flowers and it eliminates the disruptions caused by adverse weather conditions, which allows the farm to produce year round.

Moonflower uses a closed-loop system for capturing rainwater to feed its crops. The water is treated and oxygenated so that it can be reused. Not having to pay for water from the City of Houston allows the farm to operate more economically and sell its produce at an affordable price to restaurants and individuals.

"Our hydroponic farm uses 90-percent less water than conventional farms," Moonflower founder and CEO Federico Marques said in a statement. "We provide year-round produce to residents in historically underserved communities and donate produce to local charitable food systems."

One of those charities is Houston non-profit Second Servings, which "rescues" food from restaurants and events and distributes it to food pantries and other resources.

"The donations we receive from Moonflower Farms are incredible," Second Servings founder and president Barbara Bronstein said. "Their hydroponically grown greens are so appreciated by the needy Houstonians we serve, who lack affordable, convenient access to fresh produce."

Recently, Moonflower introduced a SupaGreens subscription box that allows customers to purchase greens weekly, bimonthly, or monthly. The box is delivered directly to consumers.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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