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Another life science company locks in site at Pearland's Lower Kirby

In December 2021, life-science company Millar, Inc. hopped on the Pearland bandwagon and broke ground on a headquarters, R&D, and manufacturing facility in Lower Kirby.

It joins fellow big names Lonza, Merit Medical, Cardiovascular Systems, and Endress+Hauser, among others, which are already located in the area that's popular with life science, energy, and manufacturing businesses.

“We looked everywhere, all over, when we were deciding where to move, but ultimately we decided that Pearland, with its life science presence, was the place for us,” says Millar CEO Tim Daugherty. “We know that this facility is going to take us to the next level as a company.”

Located on a five-acre site on Kirby Drive, just south of Beltway 8, the 56,000-square-foot facility will be home to approximately 120 employees and is scheduled to open in 2022. The headquarters and manufacturing facility will also house the company’s R&D and warehouse functions.

Pearland Economic Development Corporation and Pearland city officials began working with Millar on its relocation to a tract within Lower Kirby, furthering their reputation as a city that supports new and small businesses.

Lower Kirby is a 1,200-acre mixed-use development in northwest Pearland, at the intersection of South Beltway 8 and State Highway 288, that's home to office, retail, commercial, and industrial projects and continuing to expand.

Founded in 1969, Millar, Inc. pioneered the development of pressure sensor technology, directing its design and manufacturing expertise toward integrating that technology into catheters for life sciences and clinical applications.

Today, it's a leading developer and manufacturer of those pressure sensor-enabled devices, and partners with global leaders in technology, manufacturing, and healthcare to turn breakthrough technologies into life-saving medical innovations.

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Building Houston

 
 

Nancy and Rich Kinder gifted $50M to their eponymous center. Photo courtesy

Houston’s most generous couple has once again gifted a massive sum to a local institution. Rich and Nancy Kinder’s Kinder Foundation has donated $50 million to Rice University’s Kinder Institute for Urban Research, the organization announced.

The Kinder's generous grant will assist the institute’s focus on what it dubs “inclusive prosperity” — that is, “ensuring that everyone can contribute to Houston's success and share in its opportunities.”

This new grant follows the approximately $30 million he Kinder Foundation previously gifted Rice’s Kinder Institute and its affiliates to facilitate its headquarters.

“Over the past decade, the Kinder Institute has played an integral role in shaping Houston,” said Rich Kinder, chairman of the Kinder Foundation. “However, we can do more to inform and more directly address the challenges our communities face, particularly in the areas of housing, education, economic mobility, health and population research.”

To that end, the Kinders’ funds will ensure the institute can assist its partners regardless of their ability to pay for research. Funds will also help the institute respond to community research needs quickly during times of crisis — such as a catastrophic storm or pandemic — when funds aren’t readily available.

Kinder Institute director Ruth López Turley calls the grant “a gift to all of Houston,” speaking to the institute’s work to improve lives through data, research, engagement and action.

“Inclusive prosperity doesn’t just happen spontaneously,” she noted in a statement. “It requires an explicit effort informed by research. Lots of organizations are working hard to make things better, but most of them have very limited research capacity, and that’s what the Kinder Institute is primed to do.”

Founded in 2010, the institute has evolved into a leader in research, data, and policy analysis of critical issues such as housing, transportation, and education. The institute also releases the familiar Kinder Houston Area Survey, which charts significant changes in the way area residents perceive and understand Houston’s ongoing challenges and opportunities.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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