sustainable tech

Houston blockchain-as-a-service company rolls out automated ESG tool

Data Gumbo, founded by Andrew Bruce, has launched a new tool for customers focused on transparency and ESG reporting. Photo courtesy of Data Gumbo

A Houston tech company that has created a blockchain-backed interconnected industrial smart contract network is announcing a new tool to help its industrial clients automate environmental, social and corporate governance tracking and reporting.

Data Gumbo, provider of GumboNet™, announced today its new tool, GumboNet ESG, a sustainability measurement solution that can pull together a company's operational data to ESG standards reporting. The tool incorporates the Sustainability Accounting Standards Board framework for transparency and allows industrial companies access to real-time verifiable environmental performance monitoring.

"GumboNet ESG provides the ability to execute a company's monitoring of sustainability goals over time across their supply chain, providing trustworthy and auditable reports for the market against the credible and widely used SASB standards," says Andrew Bruce, founder and CEO of Data Gumbo, in a news release. "It's a new dawn for reliable and automated environmental impact measurements based on smart contracts powered and secured by blockchain."

Existing Data Gumbo customers will have access to the GumboNet ESG as part of their GumboNet subscription. All GumboNet ESG users can use the ESG tool to provide verified and transparent reporting to their customers, investors, media, and more.

"Data Gumbo is poised to address sustainability measurement growing pains with near real-time environmental data from the field," says Jeff Cohen, CAIA, director of Capital Markets Integration, in the release. "GumboNet ESG stands to enable accurate, automated measurement by industrial sectors as to their carbon emissions, while saving time, human capital and money. This solution supports better reporting into SASB standards in a way that could ultimately scale to all sectors of the economy."

Founded in 2016 and originally beginning in the energy industry, Data Gumbo has since expanded into water management and construction and has made international expansions, as well as raising over $13 million in venture capital investment, most recently a series B round that closed last year.

With the robust network and reliability of GumboNet, growing client base, and an increased focus on ESG across industries, it made sense to Bruce to tap into ESG reporting for customers.

"Our smart contract network is extremely efficient in its ability to track, report and audit the carbon footprint across supply chains," Bruce says in the release. "This is based on field data and facts, not estimates, as it's also the data that companies are invoicing with and paying bills off. GumboNet ESG empowers companies to tackle previously nonexistent, difficult or subpar measurement strategies around emissions and carbon tracking, providing the trust required for accurate, provable — not estimated — ESG reporting."

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Building Houston

 
 

According to a new report, Houston's workforce isn't among the happiest in the nation. Photo via Getty Images

Call it the Bayou City Blues. A report from job website Lensa ranks Houston third among the U.S. cities with the unhappiest workers.

The report looks at four factors — vacation days taken, hours worked per week, average pay, and overall happiness — to determine the happiest and unhappiest cities for U.S. workers.

Lensa examined data for 30 major cities, including Dallas and San Antonio. Dallas appears at the top of the list of the cities with the unhappiest workers, and San Antonio lands at No. 8.

Minneapolis ranks first among the cities with the happiest workers.

Here's how Houston fared in the four ranking categories:

  • 16.6 million unused vacation days per year.
  • 40.1 average hours worked per week.
  • Median annual pay of $32,251.
  • Happiness score of out of 50.83.

Dallas had 19.4 million unused vacation days per year, 40.5 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $34,479, and a happiness score of 53.3 out of 100.

Meanwhile, San Antonio had 5.7 million unused vacation days per year, 39.2 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $25,894, and a happiness score of 48.61.

Texas tops Lensa's list of the states with the unhappiest workers.

"While the Lone Star State had a decent happiness score of 52.56 out of 100, it scored poorly on each of the other factors, with Texans allowing an incredible 67.1 million earned vacation days go to waste over the course of a year," Lensa says.

In terms of general happiness, Houston shows up at No. 123 on WalletHub's most recent list of the happiest U.S. cities. Dallas takes the No. 104 spot, and San Antonio lands at No. 141. Fremont, California, grabs the No. 1 ranking.

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