now delivering

Amazon ramps up delivery service in Houston with 4 new outposts

Amazon is delivering four new stations to Houston. Photo courtesy of Amazon

Houstonians who anxiously watch their Amazon order status when it's "out for delivery" can take heart that the process may now be speedier.

Jeff Bezos' global juggernaut of all things shopping has just announced four new delivery stations in Houston, aimed specifically at increasing efficiency for deliveries.

How do these delivery stations work? Packages from Amazon's fulfillment and sortation centers are shipped to delivery stations, where they are loaded into vehicles for final delivery.

Amazon expects the new sites to open later this year, per a press release. The new delivery station locations are

  • 9155 Derrington Rd. (76011)
  • 11311 N Gessner Dr. (77064)
  • Northcrest and Spring Steubner in Spring (77064)
  • Interstate 59 and Kingwood Dr. (77365)

These new sites also offer employment opportunities, creating more than 300 new, full-time jobs. The gigs pay a $15 per hour starting wage and offer a variety of benefits packages.

Delivery stations also offer entrepreneurs the opportunity to build their own business delivering Amazon packages, as well as independent contractors the flexibility to be their own boss and create their own schedule delivering for Amazon Flex, the company notes.

"We are excited to continue our investment in Texas with new delivery stations across Houston that will create hundreds of new job opportunities and provide faster and more efficient delivery for customers," said Amazon spokesperson Daniel Martin in a statement. "We look forward to continuing our growth in Texas and want to thank local and state leaders for their support in making these projects possible."

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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