well protected

Joint venture between two Houston companies creates new mask line with disease-destroying tech

Blended Huemanity's masks use zinc woven into the material to kill microbes of the virus. Photo via blendedhuemanity.com

Two Houston companies have joined forces to create a new line of protective face masks that are able to deactivate the coronavirus.

Accel Lifestyle and Ascend Performance Materials have partnered to create Blended Huemanity, which has released its Acteev Protect™ Nonwoven Mask.

"The partnership between Accel Lifestyle and Ascend Performance Materials brings together two powerhouse companies, with expertise in science, fabric, manufacturing, branding and consumer products," says Megan Eddings, founder and CEO of Accel Lifestyle, in a statement. "If the last few months have shown us anything, the need for face coverings isn't going anywhere. We all want to return to normal life — sporting events, family gatherings, hugs with friends — but we want to do so safely and comfortably."

The mask's design incorporates natural ingredients in the Acteev™ technology that the University of Cambridge has confirmed can eliminate COVID-19, SARS-CoV-2, with 99.9 percent efficacy. Ascend is currently seeking the appropriate regulatory protocols with the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency, the U.S. Food and Drug Administration and other governmental agencies.

"Acteev's active layer of defense uses safe, environmentally friendly active zinc ions embedded into the matrix of the polymer – not a chemical spray that will wash away or flake off — meaning these masks can be used again and again," says Phil McDivitt, CEO of Ascend, the company that invented Acteev™ technology, in the release.

Comfort and efficiency were both priorities for the design.

"Even the best masks only offer protection if they're worn, and the Acteev Protect™ Nonwoven Mask is so soft and breathable that it's comfortable to wear for hours," McDivitt says in the release. "They are a great choice for teachers, restaurant staff, transportation workers and anyone whose lifestyle takes them out of their homes and into the world."

The company is currently selling the masks for $99 for a pack of 25. They are available online for health care workers or citizens alike.

"We are wildly excited about protecting not only our frontline healthcare workers but the entire population," says Eddings in the release. "Both Phil McDivitt and I, along with our teams, have a passion for creating products that serve the health and protection of humanity. The fact that we are able to combine our team's resources and strengths and produce products that will truly save lives is profound and beautiful."

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

"There's something magical happening in Houston, and [VCs] want a piece of it." Photo via Getty Images

Houston's seen a growth in startup and venture investment — even amid the pandemic — and a group of Houston innovators sat down for a virtual event to discuss what's lead to this evolution.

The Greater Houston Partnership hosted an installment of its Houston Industry Series focused on Digital Tech on Thursday, September 24. The panel of experts, moderated by Krisha Tracy of Google Cloud, discussed how they've observed the paradigm shift that's occurred in Houston over the past few years — and why.

Missed the discussion? Here are some significant overheard moments from the virtual event.

“I think there really is an interest for venture capital here, both locally and also welcoming it from outside of Houston. … There’s something magical happening in Houston, and [VCs] want a piece of it. I think that magical piece is a renewed interest in collaborating.”

Stephanie Campbell, managing director of Houston Angel Network and co-founder of The Artemis Fund. "I think a lot [of this progress] is due to the GHP, Houston Exponential, and the founding of the HX Venture Fund to bring those venture funds to Houston to say, 'what's happening here?'" Campbell adds, saying that this connectivity and collaboration that's happening in Houston VC is unique.

“I think there’s a misconception around all we do is oil and gas and life science in Houston, but when you think about what VC-backable companies look like, they’re tech, they’re B2B SaaS, they’re highly scalable, and they don’t tend to be capital-intensive types of things we see corporate venture backing.”

Campbell says, adding "the connectivity and the interest in VC is really taking off. It's an exciting time to be in Houston and Texas in general."

“Plug and Play’s ventures team is based in Silicon Valley and one thing they enjoy about meeting Houston-based founders is valuations tend to be more reasonable than in the Bay Area."

Payal Patel, director of Plug and Play Tech Center in Houston. "There are gems to be found," she adds.

“I don’t know what it is — if it’s something in the water or just Texans being very friendly, but the investors here share deal flow. It takes a village, and I think we all understand a rising tide lifts all boats."

Patel says on the collaborative nature of Houston. "It's really magical."

“What you’re witnessing is a city that has been waiting for industrial innovation to reach the point where it can be adopted at a really high scale, and that happened around 2017.”

Jon Nordby, managing director at MassChallenge Texas in Houston. Nordby adds that MassChallenge in Houston hasn't been keen on consumer tech, or the "grilled cheese delivery apps," as he describes. "We like companies that are in love with problems, not so much in love with solutions. … We build really meaningful tech."

“Over the last year or two, we’ve seen that sleeping giant get awoken. Open and external innovation is newly adopted by more legacy industries where it wasn’t before — and that’s just created a mountain of opportunities for startups and investors alike.”

Nordby says on the shift toward this meaningful, problem-solving technology, which Houston is full of, as he observes.

Trending News