Where to be at OTC

6 can't-miss innovation events at the 2019 Houston Offshore Technology Conference

Here are five events you have to check out if you're interested in offshore innovation. Zukiman Mohamad/Pexels

It's the 50th year of the Houston Offshore Technology Conference — and a lot has changed about the program since 1969.

"In 1969 at OTC, you could see the suit we'd put humans in to go under water," Wafik Beydoun, chairman of the OTC board of directors tells InnovationMap. "Now, you can see the robots that explore the seafloor."

OTC, which takes place at NRG Park from May 6 to 9, is separated by a few different tracks. While there's no innovation track specifically, we've identified, with Beydoun's help, five different events to be sure to make if you're looking for startup involvement and innovative discussions.

May 5 — Data Gumbo's Pre-Party

Houston-based blockchain company, Data Gumbo, wants to help you start out OTC week right with a crawfish boil. Network outside of NRG Park — and with a beer in hand.

Details: The event is from 5 to 8 pm on Sunday, May 5, at The Cannon (1336 Brittmoore Rd). Learn more.

May 6 — The Rice Alliance Startup Roundup

Fifty promising energy technology companies will present to potential investors and OTC attendees. All of the startups have initial funding under their belts and are seeking their A, B, C, or later rounds with technology validation, field trial experience, and/or initial company revenue.

Details: The event is from 2 to 4:30 pm on Monday, May 6, at NRG Arena, level 2 in the Stockman's Club. Learn more.

May 6 — OTC Spotlight on New Technology® Award Program

Check out the latest and greatest from offshore tech at this awards presentation. Hey startups, here's the tech O&G companies care about.

Details: The event is from 4 to 5 pm on Monday, May 6, at NRG Center, level 1, Rotunda Area. Learn more.

May 6-8 — OTC University R&D Showcase 

The OTC University R&D Showcase provides universities the opportunity to share with attendees their current and planned R&D projects that are relevant to offshore technology and bend the ear of over 60,000 professionals.

Details: The event is from Monday, May 6, to Wednesday, May 8, at NRG Center, level 2, outside room 600. Learn more.

May 8 — Women in the Industry Sharing Experiences (WISE): Diversity Drives Innovation: Start the Conversation

Samina Farid leads the discussion on diversity, inclusion, and innovation.

Details: The event is from 7:30 to 9 am on Wednesday, May 8. Location not indicated. Learn more.

May 8 — Young Professionals: The Tech Young Professionals Need to Know About

This young professional event is inclusive, information-rich, and inspirational. The event consists of a panel discussion where you have the opportunity to learn from successful industry leaders about the future of oil and gas technology and networking where you can enjoy a game of networking Bingo and find your future business partner, new best friend, or both.

Details: The event is from 4 to 6 pm on Wednesday, May 8, in room 202. Learn more.

Bonus — Week-long exhibition 

Stop by the exhibit all week long to see examples of new offshore technology from leading companies. Learn more.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

5G could be taking over Texas — and Houston is leading the way. Photo via Getty Images

Based on one key measure, Houston sits at the forefront of a telecom revolution that could spark a regional economic impact of more than $30 billion.

Data published recently by the Texas Comptroller's Office points out that as of last November and December, Houston led all cities in Texas for the number of so-called "small cells." Small cells are a key component in the rollout of ultra-high-speed 5G wireless communication throughout the Houston area and the country.

As the Texas Comptroller's Office explains, small cells are low-powered antennas that communicate wirelessly via radio waves. They're usually installed on existing public infrastructure like street signs or utility poles, instead of the big communication towers that transmit 4G signals.

The comptroller's tally shows Houston had approved 5,455 small-cell sites as of the November-December timeframe. That dwarfs the total number of sites (1,948) for the state's second-ranked city, Dallas.

"Houston is in the vanguard of small cell permitting in Texas, and not just because it's the state's largest city; advocates have lauded its proactive approach to 5G. Other cities, particularly smaller ones, are lagging well behind," the Comptroller's Office notes.

According to CTIA, a trade group for the wireless communications industry, 5G holds the promise to deliver an economic impact of $30.3 billion in the Houston area and create 93,700 jobs. The group says industries such as health care, energy, transportation, e-commerce, and logistics stand to benefit from the emergence of 5G.

"Maintaining world-class communications infrastructure is a requirement for success in a rapidly changing global economy. Small cells and fiber technology are the key foundational components for network densification and robust 5G. Cities like Houston that have embraced the need for this infrastructure will see the benefits of 5G faster than others," Mandy Derr, government affairs director at Houston-based communications infrastructure REIT Crown Castle International Corp. and a member of the Texas 5G Alliance, tells InnovationMap.

Derr says leaders in Houston have embraced the importance of small-cell technology through "reasonable and effective" regulations and processes aimed at boosting 5G capabilities. Three major providers of wireless service — AT&T, T-Mobile, and Verizon — offer 5G to customers in the Houston area.

"More small cells and fiber provide greater and faster access for the masses, enabling the connectivity that is essential to our businesses today — whether it's accepting payments on a mobile card reader, completing a sale on the go, or reliably reaching consumers where they are," Derr says.

In a blog post, Netrality Data Centers, which operates a data center in Houston, proclaims that Houston is shaping up to be a hub of 5G innovation.

"Houston has always been on the frontline," Mayor Sylvester Turner said during a 5G roundtable discussion in 2019. "It is who we are. It is in our DNA. We are a leading city. We didn't wait for somebody else to go to the moon. Or to be the energy capital of the world. Or the largest medical center in the world. But you don't stay at the front if you don't continue to lead."

Trending News