Good press

5 tips for establishing your startup's communications and public relations plan

When it comes to setting up a PR plan for your startup, setting the right foundation is important. Getty Images

Once you've had the idea to create and sell a product or service, secured the funding to begin production, and managed to launch the company, the next step is garnering the public's attention to compete in the marketplace. That's where a communications and public relations plan comes in.

Whether you are looking at traditional earned media or hoping to gain credibility through social media channels, the right PR tactics can help you gain the awareness and recognition you need to build your company's reputation and success.

Set the goals for your communications/PR plan
First, you need to determine what you want to accomplish with your PR plan. Your plan will help brand your company leadership, products, and/or services with potential customers, business partners, future employees, prospective investors, and other stakeholders. Once you have settled on your goals, you should begin outreach to the media.

Build relationships
As a start-up, you may not have relationships with the media yet. That's okay. The key is to identify the respective reporters, producers, editors, bloggers, and social media influencers who cover your industry and begin reaching out and building connections with them before you start to pitch your story. Traditional media outlets receive hundreds of pitches and emails each week, larger outlets receive hundreds each day. Having relationships with reporters will be key to telling your story. Think of it as a partnership with the media in which you want to tell your story and at the same time provide them with quality content.

Tell your story
As a new company, telling your story is important; it is unique to you. Yet, the narrative is irrelevant if it doesn't move the public to action to buy, use, invest, report, or click. A storyline looks something like this:

  • Here is the existing service or product.
  • Here is our approach.
  • Here is why our approach is better.
  • Here is why our team is better.
  • Here is why you should use our product.

Continue to pitch
Once you have told your story, keep reporters, bloggers, and other media contacts looped in as your project progresses or your service line grows. Today's media outlets have fewer reporters than in the past, yet there are more and more stories being pitched. You can help these reporters by providing them with quality, relevant information and facts making their job easier.

Emailing the media is an excellent way to communicate with them. But remember, they receive many emails each day. Make your subject line short and sweet, and incorporate action words to help your email stand out among the competition. Ensure the body of your email is quick and to the point, as well, using bullet points if possible. If your email contains too much text, it will be deleted.

Additionally, make sure the timing is appropriate when you send a story idea. Plan appropriately and pitch your story well ahead of time. Be aware of any internal deadlines the outlet might have. Don't send a pitch or expect much coverage when there are big events happening, such as an election, College Football Championship, or an unexpected weather event.

Think digitally
I have seen too many companies ignore the importance of social media and a useful website. These tools give your company credibility. A website need not be complicated or fancy, but it does need to be updated, relevant, and have the basics on your company and leadership. Additionally, customers will search for you on social media sites. It is not necessary to have a presence on all social media channels, but do choose one or two and make a habit of posting regularly.

As with all facets of launching a business, take the time to learn the importance of communications tactics and strategies and utilize them to help launch your company into a successful future.

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Elizabeth Biar is vice president of Strategic Public Affairs, a government elations and PR/communications firm based in Houston.

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Building Houston

 
 

Re:3D is one of two Houston companies to be recognized by the SBA's technology awards. Photo courtesy of re:3D

A couple of Houston startups have something to celebrate. The United States Small Business Administration announced the winners of its Tibbetts Award, which honors small businesses that are at the forefront of technology, and two Houston startups have made the list.

Re:3D, a sustainable 3D printer company, and Raptamer Discovery Group, a biotech company that's focused on therapeutic solutions, were Houston's two representatives in the Tibbetts Award, named after Roland Tibbetts, the founder of the SBIR Program.

"I am incredibly proud that Houston's technology ecosystem cultivates innovative businesses such as re:3D and Raptamer. It is with great honor and privilege that we recognize their accomplishments, and continue to support their efforts," says Tim Jeffcoat, district director of the SBA Houston District Office, in a press release.

Re:3D, which was founded in 2013 by NASA contractors Samantha Snabes and Matthew Fiedler to tackle to challenge of larger scale 3D printing, is no stranger to awards. The company's printer, the GigaBot 3D, recently was recognized as the Company of the Year for 2020 by the Consumer Technology Association. Re:3D also recently completed The Ion Smart and Resilient Cities Accelerator this year, which has really set the 20-person team with offices in Clear Lake and Puerto Rico up for new opportunities in sustainability.

"We're keen to start to explore strategic pilots and partnerships with groups thinking about close-loop economies and sustainable manufacturing," Snabes recently told InnovationMap on the Houston Innovators Podcast.

Raptamer's unique technology is making moves in the biotech industry. The company has created a process that makes high-quality DNA Molecules, called Raptamers™, that can target small molecules, proteins, and whole cells to be used as therapeutic, diagnostic, or research agents. Raptamer is in the portfolio of Houston-based Fannin Innovation Studio, which also won a Tibbetts Award that Fannin Innovation Studio in 2016.

"We are excited by the research and clinical utility of the Raptamer technology, and its broad application across therapeutics and diagnostics including biomarker discovery in several diseases, for which we currently have an SBIR grant," says Dr. Atul Varadhachary, managing partner at Fannin Innovation Studio.

This year, 38 companies were honored online with Tibbetts Awards. Since its inception in 1982, the awards have recognized over 170,000 honorees, according to the release, with over $50 billion in funding to small businesses through the 11 participating federal agencies.

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