Good press

5 tips for establishing your startup's communications and public relations plan

When it comes to setting up a PR plan for your startup, setting the right foundation is important. Getty Images

Once you've had the idea to create and sell a product or service, secured the funding to begin production, and managed to launch the company, the next step is garnering the public's attention to compete in the marketplace. That's where a communications and public relations plan comes in.

Whether you are looking at traditional earned media or hoping to gain credibility through social media channels, the right PR tactics can help you gain the awareness and recognition you need to build your company's reputation and success.

Set the goals for your communications/PR plan
First, you need to determine what you want to accomplish with your PR plan. Your plan will help brand your company leadership, products, and/or services with potential customers, business partners, future employees, prospective investors, and other stakeholders. Once you have settled on your goals, you should begin outreach to the media.

Build relationships
As a start-up, you may not have relationships with the media yet. That's okay. The key is to identify the respective reporters, producers, editors, bloggers, and social media influencers who cover your industry and begin reaching out and building connections with them before you start to pitch your story. Traditional media outlets receive hundreds of pitches and emails each week, larger outlets receive hundreds each day. Having relationships with reporters will be key to telling your story. Think of it as a partnership with the media in which you want to tell your story and at the same time provide them with quality content.

Tell your story
As a new company, telling your story is important; it is unique to you. Yet, the narrative is irrelevant if it doesn't move the public to action to buy, use, invest, report, or click. A storyline looks something like this:

  • Here is the existing service or product.
  • Here is our approach.
  • Here is why our approach is better.
  • Here is why our team is better.
  • Here is why you should use our product.

Continue to pitch
Once you have told your story, keep reporters, bloggers, and other media contacts looped in as your project progresses or your service line grows. Today's media outlets have fewer reporters than in the past, yet there are more and more stories being pitched. You can help these reporters by providing them with quality, relevant information and facts making their job easier.

Emailing the media is an excellent way to communicate with them. But remember, they receive many emails each day. Make your subject line short and sweet, and incorporate action words to help your email stand out among the competition. Ensure the body of your email is quick and to the point, as well, using bullet points if possible. If your email contains too much text, it will be deleted.

Additionally, make sure the timing is appropriate when you send a story idea. Plan appropriately and pitch your story well ahead of time. Be aware of any internal deadlines the outlet might have. Don't send a pitch or expect much coverage when there are big events happening, such as an election, College Football Championship, or an unexpected weather event.

Think digitally
I have seen too many companies ignore the importance of social media and a useful website. These tools give your company credibility. A website need not be complicated or fancy, but it does need to be updated, relevant, and have the basics on your company and leadership. Additionally, customers will search for you on social media sites. It is not necessary to have a presence on all social media channels, but do choose one or two and make a habit of posting regularly.

As with all facets of launching a business, take the time to learn the importance of communications tactics and strategies and utilize them to help launch your company into a successful future.

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Elizabeth Biar is vice president of Strategic Public Affairs, a government elations and PR/communications firm based in Houston.

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These three startups walked away from a pitch competition with thousands of dollars in equity-free prizes. Photo courtesy of Rice University

Three startups founded by Rice University graduates have won investment prizes at an annual pitch competition.

The annual H. Albert Napier Rice Launch Challenge, or NRLC, welcomed a panel of judges to hear from six alumni-founded startups in the finals last week. The prizes on the line totaled $65,000 in equity-free funding. The event, which is separate from the student version of the competition, is hosted by Rice’s Liu Idea Lab for Innovation and Entrepreneurship.

The big winner of the 2022 competition was Rhythio Medical, a preventative heart arrhythmias treatment startup. The company won first place, which included $30,000 in equity-free funding, as well as the Audience Choice Award that came with $1,500.

Taking second place, Synopic, which facilitates faster and more accurate surgical procedures through improved endoscopic vision technology, won $20,000 in equity-free funding. Lastly, Green Room, a platform that streamlines taxes and payments for touring artists, clinched third place and $15,000.

The event, named for Rice professor emeritus and entrepreneurship program founder H. Albert Napier, was sponsored by Mercury Fund, T-Minus Solutions and Chevron Technology Ventures. This year's finalists were selected by judges made up of Rice alumni. Three judges — Danielle Conkling, director at Silicon Valley Bank, Paul Manwell, senior director at Google, and Joanna Nathan, manager of new ventures at Johnson & Johnson — listened to and evaluated each company's five-minute pitch and followed up with questions.

Rhythio Medical was founded by CEO Kunal Shah, class of 2022, and Savannah Esteve, who also serves as head of product. The technology includes a surgically injected wire that makes an irregular heart work like a healthy one. It works alongside a traditional implantable cardioverter defibrillator, however, the wire but works to prevent arrhythmias, while ICDs treat arrhythmias with a painful shock to the patient’s heart. The company lists the Texas Heart Institute and the University of Texas at Austin as its research partners.

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