who's who

3 Houston innovators to know this week

This week's innovators to know are Sean Guerre of Innovate Energy, Carolyn Rodz of Hello Alice, and Aziz Gilani of Mercury Fund. Courtesy photos

From quickly making face masks to preparing meals for hospital workers, Houstonians everywhere are finding the best way for them to give back. For these three innovators to know this week, their way of giving back is helping startups navigate this unprecedented time.

Sean Guerre, managing director of Innovate Energy

Photo courtesy of Innovate Energy

The oil and gas industry is going through an unprecedented time. Never before have energy companies had to deal with such a large discrepancy between supply and demand, and COVID-19 closures is just the cherry on top. A victim of the situation is going to be early-stage energy tech startups. However, Guerre says he is seeing interest in startups that specialize in a specific type of technology.

"We're seeing a huge interest in autonomous, unmanned solutions," Guerre says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "Anything in that remote, autonomous area that allows people to continue to do inspections, mapping, surveying, and all kinds of work that don't involve more people being involved in the process — we're seeing a real acceleration there."

Click here to read more.

Carolyn Rodz, CEO of Hello Alice

Courtesy of Hello Alice

While a bunch of companies are left idle with not much to do during the COVID-19-caused shutdown, Carolyn Rodz, CEO and co-founder of Houston-based Hello Alice, has been busier than ever. Her company, which provides digital resources for startups and small businesses, has kicked their operations into high gear.

Rodz and her team created a COVID-19 Business Center free for entrepreneurs to use, as well as announced emergency grants to businesses affected by COVID-19.

Click here to read more.

Aziz Gilani, managing director of Mercury Fund

Photo courtesy of Mercury Fund

The repercussions of the pandemic has forced Aziz Gilani to become an expert in the CARES Act in order to help Mercury Fund's portfolio companies, but Gilani has been more than willing to share his newfound expertise. He joined Rodz on a virtual panel hosted by Houston Exponential and the duo offered pertinent advice for Houston startups — especially in light of the lack of clarity in the quickly passed legislature.

"One of the challenges of the program is that it is being administered by the Small Business Administration, which traditionally hasn't worked with venture-backed and angel-backed companies," Gilani says, adding that now is the time to document everything and involve a lawyer to help you mitigate the act's details.

Click here to read more.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

These Rice University students are going for extra credit in the name of sustainability. Photo via Rice.edu

A group of Rice University students have added a new extracurricular to their transcript.

Launched last fall, Rice New Energy Fund, or RNEF, is the country's first student-managed energy transition investment fund, according to a news release from Rice. The fund's goal is to generate returns for scholarships while advancing decarbonization technology and providing education and diversity in investment.

“We needed more funds and a more focused strategy to be competitive,” Shikhar Verma , class of ’24 and founder of the fund, says in the release. “Everyone in Houston is talking about the energy transition, but not many people know what that actually entails. We want students to learn how to be responsible financiers and lead this transition.”

To join, students are required to participate in the Rice Undergraduate Finance Club’s training program and undergraduate investment fund, since the RNEF operates as a part of the club. Anyone can join the program, no matter their major.

“Our team’s diverse academic background allows us to explore investments more holistically,” Verma says. “For instance, we have engineers who can evaluate technologies and scaling risk and pre-law students to appraise the regulatory and policy environment.”

Verma says he and his fellow team members have tapped into a group of mentors, advisers and donors for the fund, including former Rice Board of Trustees chair Bobby Tudor as well as renowned executives Steve Pattyn and Stephen Trauber, per the release.

The RNEF has raised $200,000 in donations, and plans to start investing in the fall with a hope to create a portfolio of 200 new energy-related companies.

“We needed more funds and a more focused strategy to be competitive,” Verma said. “Everyone in Houston is talking about the energy transition, but not many people know what that actually entails. We want students to learn how to be responsible financiers and lead this transition.”

Trending News