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New ranking of America's smartest cities puts Houston near back of the class

When it comes to education among its residents, the Houston area lands in the bottom half of America's smartest cities. Photo by Utamaru Kido/Getty Images

Houston sits toward the back of the class when it comes to the smartest metro areas in the U.S., according to a new study.

In the study, published by personal finance website WalletHub, the Houston-The Woodlands-Sugar Land area ranks 90th among the most-educated metros. Houston trails Austin-Round Rock (No. 9) and Dallas-Fort Worth (No. 71) but outperforms San Antonio-New Braunfels (No. 106) on the 150-metro list. At the very bottom of the list are McAllen (No. 148) and Brownsville (No. 149).

Houston's ranking remains unchanged from WalletHub's 2018 study.

To determine where the most-educated Americans live, WalletHub compared the 150 largest metros across 11 metrics. That data includes the share of adults 25 and older with at least a bachelor's degree, the quality of public schools, and the gender gap in education.

Here's how Houston fared across some of the data categories (lower ranking is better):

  • No. 30 — Black-versus-white education gap
  • No. 36 — Quality of public schools
  • No. 59 — Share of adults with at least a bachelor's degree
  • No. 65 — Women-versus-men education gap
  • No. 72 — Share of adults with a graduate or professional degree
  • No. 74 — Average quality of universities
  • No. 90 — Share of adults with an associate's degree or college experience
  • No. 112 — Students enrolled in top 951 universities per capita
  • No. 135 — Share of residents with a high school diploma

The most educated metro in this year's ranking is Ann Arbor, Michigan. Visalia-Porterville, California, though, sits at the bottom of the list as the nation's least educated metro.

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This story originally appeared on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Karl Ecklund, left, and Paul Padley of Rice University have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy to continue physics research on the universe. Photo by Jeff Fitlow/Rice University

Two Rice University physicists and professors have received a federal grant to continue research on dark matter in the universe.

Paul Padley and Karl Ecklund, professors of physics and astronomy at Rice, have received a $1.3 million grant from the Department of Energy for their research to continue the university's ongoing research at the Large Hadron Collider, or LHC, a particle accelerator consisting of a 17-mile ring of superconducting magnets buried beneath Switzerland and France.

"With this grant we will be able to continue our investigations into the nature of the matter that comprises the universe, what the dark matter that permeates the universe is, and if there is physics beyond what we already know," Padley says in a press release.

This grant is a part of the DOE's $132 million in funding for high-energy physics research. The LHC has received a total of $4.5 million to date to continue this research. Most recently, Ecklund and Padley received a $3 million National Science Foundation grant to go toward updates to the LHC.

"High-energy physics research improves our understanding of the universe and is an essential element for maintaining America's leadership in science," says Paul Dabbar, undersecretary for science at the DOE, in the release. "These projects at 53 different institutions across our nation will advance efforts both in theory and through experiments that explore the subatomic world and study the cosmos. They will also support American scientists serving key roles in important international collaborations at institutions across our nation."

In 2012, Padley and his team discovered the Higgs boson, a feat that was extremely key to the continuance of exploring the Standard Model of particle physics. Since then, the physicists have been working hard to answer the many questions involved in studying physics and the universe.

"Over many decades, the particle physics group at Rice has been making fundamental contributions to our understanding of the basic building blocks of the universe," Padley says in the release. "With this grant we will be able to continue this long tradition of important work."

Paul Padley and his team as made important dark matter findings at the Large Hadron Collider in Europe. Photo via rice.ed

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