money moves

Houston software company closes $7 million series A

Houston-based vChain, creator of CodeNotary, has raised $7 million in a series A financing round. Pexels

A Houston tech company that has optimizes a notarization system for coding professionals has closed a multimillion-dollar round of funding.

Houston-based vChain, which created the CodeNotary Open Source code trust solution, has raised $7 million in a series A funding round. Paris-based Elaia Partners led the investment round, and other contributors include Zug, Switzerland-based Bluwat and Seattle-based Acequia Capital.

"CodeNotary today processes over 9 million code and container authentications every single month," says CEO Moshe Bar in a news release. "We believe this is proof that the market demands secure and simple to use trust solutions for the modern DevOps environment."

Bar, who previously founded of XenSource and Qumranet, co-founded vChain with Dennis Zimmer in late 2018. The company released its first product in April of last year, and has a secondary office in Amsterdam.

"With much more at stake both financially and reputationally, companies must act quickly to bring trust and security into their DevOps process," Bar continues. "CodeNotary was created to solve this issue and ensure that only trusted code and data run in production."

The software tool, which is used to ensure code is securely transmitted throughout the entire development to production process, has several platform integrations and works with languages such as JavaScript, Python, Go, Java, and more.

"Our vision is a digital world where every object has a globally unique and meaningful identity," says Zimmer, who serves as CTO, in the release. "For the first time, DevOps teams can completely secure the integrity of their Continuous Integration and Continuous Delivery pipelines. Not just internally, but also across companies, contributors and contractors."

The money raised will be used to continue the development of the tool as the DevOps industry continues to grow within the market.

"The DevOps industry is a rapidly growing billion-dollar market transforming itself very quickly," says Marc Rougier, partner at Elaia, in the release. "The importance of DevOps for any organization is obvious, no matter its size. However, the main reason for hesitation in DevOps transformation is a lack of trust. vChain is the leading solution to bring trust to DevOps and we're thrilled to be a part of it."

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Building Houston

 
 

Houston-based imaware, which has an at-home COVID-19 testing process, is working with Texas A&M University on researching how the virus affects the human body. Getty Images

An ongoing medical phenomenon is determining how COVID-19 affects people differently — especially in terms of severity. A new partnership between a Houston-based digital health platform and Texas A&M University is looking into differences in individual risk factors for the virus.

Imaware, which launched its at-home coronavirus testing kit in April, is using its data and information collected from the testing process for this new study on how the virus affects patients differently.

"As patient advocates, we want to aid in the search to understand more about why some patients are more vulnerable than others to the deadly complications of COVID-19," says Jani Tuomi, co-founder of imaware, in a press release. "Our current sample collection process is an efficient way to provide longitudinal prospectively driven data for research and to our knowledge, is the only such approach that is collecting, assessing, and biobanking specimens in real time."

Imaware uses a third-party lab to conduct the tests at patients' homes following the Center for Disease Control's guidelines and protocol. During the test, the medical professional takes additional swabs for the study. The test is then conducted by Austin-based Wheel, a telemedicine group.

Should the patient receive positive COVID-19 results, they are contacted by a representative of Wheel with further instructions. They are also called by a member of a team led by Dr. Rebecca Fischer, an infectious disease expert and epidemiologist and laboratory scientist at the Texas A&M University School of Public Health, to grant permission to be a part of the study.

Once a part of the study, the patient remains in contact with Fischer's team, which tracks the spread and conditions of the virus in the patient. One thing the researchers are looking for is the patients' responses to virus complications caused by an overabundance of cytokines, according to the press release. Cytokines are proteins in the body that fight viruses and infections, and, if not working properly, they can "trigger an over-exuberant inflammatory response" that can cause potentially deadly issues with lung and organ failure or worse, per the release.

"We believe strongly in supporting this research, as findings from the field can be implemented to improve clinical processes-- helping even more patients," says Wheel's executive medical director, Dr. Rafid Fadul.

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