Whose House?

UH transitions research park into incubator for early-stage, research-based startups

The University of Houston has transformed its Energy Research Park into the Technology Bridge to better connect research-based startups to the market. Natalie Harms/InnovationMap

In Houston, you can throw a rock and hit a University of Houston graduate, says Tom Campbell, executive director of IP at UH. That citywide presence means alumni have a huge part to play as the city grows its innovation ecosystem.

"It's a really cool statistic that most of the people who go to UH end up coming back or staying in the area. If we're going to build an innovation economy in Houston, it's going to be built by Cougar hands," says Campbell.

But that's not the only presence the university has in the innovation ecosystem. Over the past year, UH has transitioned its Energy Research Park — the 74-acre site that was formerly the Schlumberger headquarters — into the Technology Bridge. The strategic transformation was in part due to the fact that the research was no longer focused on energy, but Campbell says UH had another reason too.

"One of the reasons we changed the name from the Energy Research Park to the Technology Bridge is that we wanted to highlight that transition or bridge between the academic world and the market," he says.

UH's Tech Bridge has high-end wet lab space that currently houses 23 companies, plus shared and event spaces are available. The incubator is fee-based and takes no equity in the company. About half the startups are life sciences companies, while the other half being focused on physical sciences, Campbell says.

What makes UH's Tech Bridge different from anything else in Houston is that it's targeting early-stage, research-based startups. Rather than being a competitor to Houston's other workspaces or accelerators, the Tech Bridge is more of a feeder into these other establishments.

"What we've got here at the University of Houston is, I call it, distinctly different but complementary to the overall innovation ecosystem," Campbell says.

Whole different ball game
Another way UH differs from everything else out there is in its capabilities. Not being a for-profit, UH doesn't have the pressure to produce profits.

"The beauty of the role a university can play is that, unlike a venture fund, which may be looking at a three-year return window, a university can play a longer game," Campbell says. "And, by nature, universities are always playing a longer game because they are investing in this longer term research."

Though not being pressured for quick ROIs or exits, Campbell and his team have a whole other set of goals — namely, getting UH-related companies from the lab or the classroom and into the public.

"There's two things going on here," Campbell says. "We're educating the next generation of entrepreneurs via our faculty and students — that's the people side of it — and we're also trying to pull those ideas out — and that's the idea side of it."

Establishing connectivity
Startups spend an average of one and a half to two years at the Tech Bridge, Campbell says, and throughout that time, they are required to establish a connection to the university. While some startups come from campus as students, alumni, or faculty, it's not required to have a prior UH connection. However, Campbell says they must form a connection to the school while being housed in the facility. That can come from hiring interns, adjunct teaching, or something else that links the startup to UH.

One way Campbell says the startups can be mutually beneficial to the school is collaborating with UH's Wolff Center for Entrepreneurship. Technology Bridge startups can have access to business advice, while business students have the ability to get real-world experience.

"What we found is with a lot of the research-based technology we do is that we have very technically minded faculty or students who don't necessarily have the business background," Campbell says. "Well, UH also has the No. 2 ranked entrepreneurship program. So, we developed a collaboration program to bring together the technical and business sides of the University."

Preparing for The Ion
Along with all of Houston's higher education institutions, UH will have a presence in the Rice University-backed innovation hub called The Ion. While the details of the arrangement of the education partners aren't yet established, Campbell says it's UH's focus to be present in the new facility, whether through its startups or its innovation team's office hours.

The Ion will give the schools a unique opportunity to collaborate in a way they've never before had the chance to do.

"Universities kind of by nature compete against themselves," says Campbell. "We spend a lot of time meeting with internal and external people and explain that a strong innovation economy in Houston is a tide that floats all ships."

The thing that Campbell strives to make clear to the city is that UH has something different to offer the ecosystem.

"We're relatively small group in that ecosystem, and we're different," he says. "We're an apple in a box of oranges. One of the challenges I have is trying to get people to understand is that this is a little bit of a different approach."

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Building Houston

 
 

This week's roundup of Houston innovators includes Thomas Vassiliades of BiVACOR, Katie Mehnert of ALLY Energy, and Don Whaley of OhmConnect Texas. Courtesy photos

Editor's note: In this week's roundup of Houston innovators to know — the first of this new year — I'm introducing you to three local innovators across industries — from health care innovation to energy — recently making headlines in Houston innovation.


Thomas Vassiliades, CEO of BiVACOR

BiVACOR named Thomas Vassiliades as CEO effective immediately. Photo courtesy of BiVACOR

Thomas Vassiliades has been named CEO of BiVACOR, and he replaces the company's founder, Daniel Timms, in the position. BiVACOR is on track to head toward human clinical trials and commercialization, and Vassiliades is tasked with leading the way.

Vassiliades has over 30 years of experience within the medical device industry as well as cardiothoracic surgery. He was most recently the general manager of the surgery and heart failure business at Abiomed and held several leadership roles at Medtronic. Dr. Vassiliades received his MD from the University of North Carolina, and his MBA was achieved with distinction at Emory University.

“I am excited and honored to join the BiVACOR team, working closely with Daniel and the entire team as we look forward to bringing this life-changing technology to the market,” says Dr. Vassiliades in the release. “Throughout my career, I’ve been guided by the goal of bringing innovative cardiovascular therapies to the market to improve patient care and outcomes – providing solutions for those that don’t have one. BiVACOR is uniquely well-positioned to provide long-term therapy for patients with severe biventricular heart failure.” Click here to read more.

Katie Mehnert, CEO and founder of ALLY Energy

Katie Mehnert joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss the future of energy amid a pandemic, climate change, the Great Resignation, and more. Photo via Katie Mehnert

Katie Mehnert started ALLY Energy — originally founded as Pink Petro — to move forward DEI initiatives, and she says she started with building an audience first and foremost, but now the technology part of the platform has fallen into place too. Last summer, ALLY Energy acquired Clean Energy Social, which meant doubling its community while also onboarding new technology. On the episode, Mehnert reveals that this new website and platform is now up and running.

"We launched the integrated product a few weeks back," Mehnert says. "The whole goal was to move away from technology that wasn't serving us."

Now, moving into the new year, Mehnert is building the team the company needs. She says she hopes to grow ALLY from two employees to 10 by the end of the year and is looking for personnel within customer support, product developers, and sales and service. While ALLY is revenue generating, she also hopes to fundraise to further support scaling. Click here to read more.

Don Whaley, president at OhmConnect Texas

Texas is about a month away from the anniversary of Winter Storm Uri — would the state fair better if it saw a repeat in 2022? Photo courtesy

The state of Texas is about a month away from the one year anniversary of Winter Storm Uri — but is the state better prepared this winter season? Don Whaley, president at OhmConnect Texas, looked at where the state is now versus then in a guest column for InnovationMap.

"Governor Abbott has gone on record guaranteeing that the lights will stay on this winter, and I am inclined to agree. With the reinforcement of our fuel systems being mandated by the Railroad Commission, 2023 to 2025 should receive the same guarantee," he writes. "Beyond that, as the demand for electricity in Texas continues to grow, we will need to rely on the initiatives under consideration by the PUCT to attract investment and innovation in new, dispatchable generation and flexible demand solutions to ensure long-term stability in the ERCOT market.

Whaley has worked for over 40 years in the natural gas, electricity, and renewables industries, with specific experience in deregulated markets across the U.S. and Canada. He founded Direct Energy Texas and served as its president during the early years of deregulation. Click here to read more.

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