Calling all future coders — here's a new spot to tap into your new career. Image via Getty Images

Tech Elevator, a national coding education provider, opened its latest campus last month in the Houston area.

The new facility, located within Industrious Westchase, at 2101 CityWestBlvd, will teach students through its well-known coding bootcamps, as well as provide locally focused career placement support and a co-working space.

The company has named Brian Candido, who has more than 10 years experience in career services, as Market Leader for Tech Elevator Houston. He'll oversee campus operations, admissions, student and alumni engagement, event coordination and business development at the new site.

“Houston is known as the energy capital of the world, but its tech ecosystem is far more diverse than that," Candido said in a statement. "From space technology to biotech and everything in between, Houston has a thriving tech scene that is making waves on the national and international stage.”

The Houston campus will host one of its first events, Women, Wine and Web Design, on May 3. Laptops with Chrome or Firefox are required. Click here for more information.

Tech Elevator's immersive online bootcamps are offered in 14-week, full-time, part-time, in-person and National Live Remote sessions. The Houston campus is the company's ninth location in the U.S., with others located in Cleveland, Cincinnati, Pittsburgh, Philadelphia, Washington D.C.; Columbus, Ohio; Jersey City, New Jersey; and Wilmington, North Carolina.

Anthony Hughes, co-Founder and CEO, said the company is expanding to Houston after seeing an increased local interest in Tech Elevator's bootcamps.

“We’re expanding our footprint into Houston to meet that growing demand and we look forward to making a big impact with local individuals, local companies and communities,” Hughes said in a statement.

The company has placed close to 3,000 students in technology jobs, and claims a graduation rate of 93 percent and a job placement rate of 88 percent, according to a release. It is now accepting student applications for its 2023 coding bootcamp cohorts.

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2 Houston startups selected by US military for geothermal projects

hot new recruits

Two clean energy companies in Houston have been recruited for geothermal projects at U.S. military installations.

Fervo Energy is exploring the potential for a geothermal energy system at Naval Air Station Fallon in Nevada.

Meanwhile, Sage Geosystems is working on an exploratory geothermal project for the Army’s Fort Bliss post in Texas. The Bliss project is the third U.S. Department of Defense geothermal initiative in the Lone Star State.

“Energy resilience for the U.S. military is essential in an increasingly digital and electric world, and we are pleased to help the U.S. Army and [the Defense Innovation Unit] to support energy resilience at Fort Bliss,” Cindy Taff, CEO of Sage, says in a news release.

A spokeswoman for Fervo declined to comment.

Andy Sabin, director of the Navy’s Geothermal Program Office, says in a military news release that previous geothermal exploration efforts indicate the Fallon facility “is ideally suited for enhanced geothermal systems to be deployed onsite.”

As for the Fort Bliss project, Michael Jones, a project director in the Army Office of Energy Initiatives, says it’ll combine geothermal technology with innovations from the oil and gas sector.

“This initiative adds to the momentum of Texas as a leader in the ‘geothermal anywhere’ revolution, leveraging the robust oil and gas industry profile in the state,” says Ken Wisian, associate director of the Environmental Division at the U.S. Bureau of Economic Geology.

The Department of Defense kicked off its geothermal initiative in September 2023. Specifically, the Army, Navy, and Defense Innovation Unit launched four exploratory geothermal projects at three U.S. military installations.

One of the three installations is the Air Force’s Joint Base San Antonio. Canada-based geothermal company Eavor is leading the San Antonio project.

Another geothermal company, Atlanta-based Teverra, was tapped for an exploratory geothermal project at the Army’s Fort Wainwright in Alaska. Teverra maintains an office in Houston.

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This article originally ran on EnergyCapital.

Report: Houston secures spot on list of top 50 startup cities

by the numbers

A new ranking signals great promise for the growth of Houston’s startup network.

Houston ranks among the world’s top 50 startup cities on a new list from PitchBook, a provider of data and research about capital markets. In fact, Houston comes in at No. 50 in the ranking. But if you dig deeper into the data, Houston comes out on top in one key category.

The city earns a growth score of 63.8 out of 100 — the highest growth score of any U.S. city and the seventh highest growth score in the world. In the growth bucket, Houston sits between between Paris (64.4) and Washington, D.C. (61.7).

The PitchBook growth score reflects short-term, midterm, and long-term growth momentum for activity surrounding venture capital deals, exits, and fundraising for the past six years.

PitchBook’s highest growth score (86.5) goes to Hefei, a Chinese manufacturing hub for electric vehicles, solar panels, liquid crystal displays, home appliances, and Lenovo computers.

The overall ranking is based on a scoring system that relies on proprietary PitchBook data about private companies. The system’s growth and development scores are based on data related to deals, exits, fundraising and other factors.

Houston earns a development score of 34.1 out of 100, which puts it in 50th place globally in that regard. This score measures the size and maturity of a city’s startup network.

Topping the overall list is San Francisco, followed by New York City and Beijing. Elsewhere in Texas, Austin appears at No. 16 and Dallas at No. 36.

The ranking “helps founders, operators, and investors assess locations when deciding where to expand or invest,” says PitchBook.

“Network effects matter in venture capital: Investors get more than half of their deals through referrals, according to research led by Harvard professor Paul Gompers,” PitchBook goes on to say. “So it stands to reason that dealmakers should seek these networks out when deciding where to do business.”