MacroFab has secured fresh investment to the tune of $42 million. Photo via macrofab.com

A Houston company has nearly doubled its total raised with its latest funding round.

MacroFab, a Houston-based electronics manufacturing platform, has announced $42 million in new growth capital led by Foundry and joined by BMW i Ventures, as well as existing investors Edison Partners and ATX Venture Partners. The platform was first launched by Misha Govshteyn and Chris Church in 2015.

“Given MacroFab’s compelling solutions to electronics manufacturing challenges and Foundry’s successful history with parallel companies, our investment is a perfect fit," Foundry Partner Seth Levine says in a news release. "This is a unique opportunity to be part of next generation cloud manufacturing and we’re excited to be joining forces with Misha and his team."

MacroFab built a platform that manage electronics manufacturing and enables real-time supply chain and inventory data. The platform can help customers go from prototype to high-scale production with its network of more than 100 factories across the continent.

“Electronics manufacturing is moving toward resilience and flexibility to reduce supply chain disruptions. These are long term trends recognized by Foundry and BMW i Ventures, who joined this round as investors,” says Govshteyn, MacroFab’s CEO, in a news release. “We are in the earliest stages of repositioning the supply chain to be more localized and focused on what matters to customers most — the ability to deliver products on time, meet changing requirements, and achieve a more sustainable ecological footprint. MacroFab is fundamental to building this new operating model.”

The company has seen significant growth amid the evolution of global supply chain that's taken place over the past few years. According to the company, shipments were up 275 percent year-over-year. To keep up with growth, MacroFab doubled its workforce, per the release, and opened a new facility in Mexico.

“Most companies have felt the pain of inflexible and fragile supply chains," says Daniel Herscovici, partner at Edison Partners, a growth equity firm focused on technology-enabled and SaaS solutions. "MacroFab’s cloud manufacturing platform is transforming contract manufacturing, enabling ‘Made in North America, faster design iteration, and increased supply chain resiliency, among its benefits. Edison Partners shares the company’s vision for addressing this more than $100 billion global market."

Misha Govshteyn, CEO of MacroFab Misha Govshteyn is the founder and CEO of MacroFab. Photo courtesy of MacroFab

Houston-based GoCo.io has raised fresh funding and launched the latest version of its platform. Courtesy of GoCo

Houston SaaS company raises $15M series B, announces latest release

money moves

A Houston startup that is optimizing human resource operations for small businesses has raised fresh funding from an Austin-based venture capital investor.

GoCo.io raised $15 million in September in a funding round led by ATX Venture Partners. Founded in 2015, the company has raised $27.5 million to date, including its $7 million series A in 2019.

The fresh funding will be used to continue expanding on the company's software services operations and upgrades to its product, which is is modernizing HR, benefits, and payroll.

“We believe that GoCo is the company best positioned to provide HR departments at SMBs with the most flexible employee management software,” says Chris Shonk, general partner at ATX Venture Partners, in a news release. “In a crowded marketplace, GoCo clearly rises to the top with its ease-of-use, flexibility and unparalleled customization.

"We’re excited to be a part of GoCo’s journey, and we look forward to supporting their continued innovation as they solve new and existing challenges HR departments face,” he continues.

Last month, the company launched its latest version of the platform, which included new features, enhanced user experience, and increased integrations. Over the past two years, the company has doubled its team to keep up with its customer growth and product development.

“GoCo is the trusted HR software SMBs rely on and we’re thrilled to reach an exciting funding milestone,” says Nir Leibovich, CEO of GoCo, in the release. “This new investment will enable us to provide additional leap-frog HR technology solutions that ensure every organization’s success by eliminating manual HR tasks. SMBs are facing significant challenges right now and GoCo has grown rapidly because we are able to not only meet but exceed HR departments’ needs and expectations.

"GoCo looks forward to expanding upon providing an outstanding customer experience through this new phase of growth as we launch our newest value-added product this fall,” he continues.

MacroFab's latest $15 million round will help it expand and grow throughout North America. Photo via macrofab.com

Houston-based electronics manufacturing biz raises $15M in new funding

money moves

A Houston company that has optimized electronics manufacturing by setting up a digital platform connecting a network of factories across North America has raised its latest round of funding.

MacroFab closed a $15 million series B round led by New Jersey-based Edison Partners. ATX Venture Partners also participated, along with strategic investor Altium Limited, a leader in the electronics design software space.

The new funds will go toward keeping up with MacroFab's growth, specifically in expanding in North America and an increased investment in research and development, sales and marketing, and the opening of a new distribution center for international logistics this summer, according to a news release.

"MacroFab customers found themselves in a perfect storm last year, and went from being curious about cloud-enabled manufacturing to going all-in," says Misha Govshteyn, MacroFab CEO, in the release. "The turbulence started with the trade war and tariffs, and only accelerated with massive delays in delivering products from overseas and the ongoing microchip availability crisis.”

Govshteyn says the pandemic has affected traditional manufacturing processes. While some companies utilized manufacturing in China, international travel meant for impossible in-person troubleshooting. Digitization became increasingly optimal.

"Supply chain leaders are turning to MacroFab and our digital platform as a way to move faster," Govshteyn continues in the release. "If you're not as big as Apple, but want to build across multiple factories in parallel, our platform is the only way to do so without incurring immense costs".

MacroFab was founded in 2013 and has raised both seed and series A financing led by ATX Venture Partners and Techstars. Govshteyn and his co-founders — Chris Church, who serves as chief product officer, Chris Granberry, the company's COO — previously co-founded Alert Logic.

The trio of entrepreneurs reconvened to address an opportunity in a market that was home to an antiquated process within manufacturing. Lately, MacroFab's clients are looking to reduce waste.

"A typical electronics factory is only 60 percent utilized, according to New Venture Research, which is startlingly inefficient," Church says in the release. "A number of our customers focused on Environmental and Social Governance (ESG) issues see our ability to tap into this capacity as a step towards ecologically sustainable production."

The deal includes a new board member for MacroFab. Daniel Herscovici, partner at Edison Partners, will join MacroFab's board of directors

The company has "a proven track record of building successful SaaS and cloud infrastructure businesses together, and are now bringing supply chain innovation to the market at a time when global electronics manufacturing is facing disruption," Herscovici says in the release. "MacroFab is at the center of driving the digital transformation needed to unlock factory capacity, manufacturing agility and efficiency, and even new economic and labor markets for electronics makers across North America."

MacroFab's raise also included a new strategic partnership with Altium, one of the largest players in the electronics design space, per the release.

"Altium shares MacroFab's vision for digital transformation of manufacturing in the electronics industry," says Ted Pawela, chief ecosystem officer at Altium. "Our investment in, and partnership with MacroFab is a huge step forward in connecting design, supply chain, and manufacturing to accelerate innovation."

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Growing Houston-based drone software company snags government contract

ready for liftoff

Ty Audronis quite literally grew up in Paradise. But the Northern California town was destroyed by wildfire in 2018, including Audronis’ childhood home.

“That’s why it’s called the Campfire Region,” says the founder, who explains that the flames were started by a spark off a 97-year-old transmission line.

But Audronis, who has literally written the book on designing purpose-built drones — actually, more than one — wasn’t going to sit back and let it happen again. Currently, wildfire prevention is limited to the “medieval technology” of using towers miles apart to check for smoke signals.

“By the time you see smoke signals, you’ve already got a big problem,” Audronis says.

His idea? To replace that system with real-time, three-dimensional, multi-spectral mapping, which exactly where his company, Tempest Droneworx, comes in.

When asked how he connected with co-founder Dana Abramowitz, Audronis admits that it was Match.com — the pair not only share duties at Tempest, they are engaged to be married. It was a 2021 pre-SXSW brainstorming session at their home that inspired the pair to start Tempest.

When Audronis mentioned his vision of drone battalions, where each is doing a specialized task, Abramowitz, a serial entrepreneur and founder who prefers to leave the spotlight to her partner, told him that he shouldn’t give the idea away at a conference, they should start a company. After all, Audronis is a pioneer in the drone industry.

“Since 1997, I’ve been building multicopters,” he says.

Besides publishing industry-standard tomes, he took his expertise to the film business. But despite its name, Tempest is a software company and does not make drones.

That software is called Harbinger. Audronis explains that the real-time management and visualization solution is viewable on practically any device, including mobile or augmented reality. The system uses a video game engine for viewing, but as Audronis puts it, “the magic happens” on the back end.

Harbinger is not just drone-agnostic, but can use crowd-sourced data as well as static sensors. With the example of wildfires in mind, battalions can swarm an affected area to inform officials, stopping a fire before it gets out of hand. But fires are far from Harbinger’s only intended use.

The civilian version of Harbinger will be available for sale at the end of 2023 or beginning of 2024. For military use, Navy vet Audronis says that the product just entered Technical Readiness Level (TRL) 5, which means that they are about 18 months away from a full demo. The latest news for Tempest is that earlier this month, it was awarded a “Direct to Phase II” SBIR (Government Small Business Innovation Research) contract with the United States Department of the Air Force.

Not bad for a company that was, until recently, fully bootstrapped. He credits his time with the Houston Founder Institute, from which he graduated last February, and for which he now mentors, with many of the connections he’s made, including SBIR Advisors, who helped handle the complex process of getting their SBIR contract.

And he and Abramowitz have no plans to end their collaborations now that they’re seeing growth.

“Our philosophy behind [our business] isn’t keeping our cards close to our vest,” says Audronis. “Any potential competitors, we want to become partners.”

The company was just the two founders until five weeks ago, when Tempest’s size doubled, including a full-time developer. Once Tempest receives its SIBR check, the team will grow again to include more developers. They are currently looking for offices in the city. As Audronis says, Tempest Droneworx is “100-percent made in Houston.” Paradise may have been lost, but with Harbinger soon to be available, such a disaster need never happen again.

Dana Abramowitz and Ty Audronis co-founded Tempest Droneworks. Photo courtesy of Tempest Droneworx

Report: Houstonians lose days-worth of time each year due to rush hour

not in the fast lane

Traffic is a part of life in Houston. But a new study quantifies just how much time the average Bayou City dweller spends sitting in rush hour gridlock every year—and the results are eye opening.

According to a study released this month by CoPilot, Houstonians lose nearly four days of time each year due to rush hour commuting.

The report found that rush hour extends Houstonians' commute by an extra 22 minutes per day. Annually, that totaled an additional 91.6 hours commuting due to rush hour.

This earned the Houston area (including the Woodlands and Sugar Land) a No. 8 spot on CoPilot's list of cities where commuters lose the most time to rush hour.

Evening commutes saw the highest increase in time in Houston, with the average commuter spending 14 additional minutes on roadways due to rush hour. Morning rush hour in Houston added about eight minutes to commuters' daily drives.

Houston was the only Texas city to make CoPilot's list of the top 15 cities that lost the most time to rush hour traffic. New York drivers lost the most time to rush hour, which adds about 32 minutes to daily commutes and 132 hours a year, according to the report. Los Angeles drivers lost the second-most time, followed by urban Honolulu, Miami, Baton Rouge, Louisiana; and Birmingham, Alabama.

The report found that drivers in Houston spend about eight more minutes commuting during rush hour than the average driver in the county. That totals to about 30 more hours per year than the average U.S. driver.

Commute times have been dropping nationally, reaching a low of 25.6 minutes in 2021 compared to 27.6 minutes in 2019, as more workers have transitioned to hybrid schedules or working from home, according to CoPilot

In 2020, Houston drivers even witnessed a 33 percent drop in traffic compared to in 2019, according to a study from Rice.

Still, Houston roadways are consistently ranked among the most congested in the country. Last year, a similar study found that the typical Houston driver wasted 46 hours due to traffic congestion.

Portions of the 610 West Loop are notorious for being ranked as the state's most congested roadways, and other stretches of roads are known as some of the worst bottlenecks in Texas.