Keep It Simple

The simplest way for Houston sports fans to buy the best tickets

Cheer on the Astros for less. Courtesy photo

One of the best things about going to an Astros or Texans game is cheering on your team live and in person, but one of the worst has got to be the ticket fees.

Most ticket sites surprise you at check-out by tacking on fees of 30 percent or more, turning what might have been an affordable experience into a pricey outing.

But SimpleSeats doesn't charge buyers any fees, all while still offering Houston sports fans the best possible tickets in their chosen price zone.

Michael Dillon, a local former sports executive who spent eight years in the Astros front office, along with a team of sports enthusiasts and ticket experts, figured out how to get fans tickets without the fees.

It works like this: You pick the zone. They pick the seat at the best possible price (and if you want to pick your exact seat, you can do that, too). All tickets purchased together are seated together, so there's no worry about your party being separated.

All purchases are protected by the SimpleSeats guarantee, which vows that your transaction is safe and protected, and that you will receive your tickets on time. If tickets are available, you can purchase right up until the start of the game!

The goal of SimpleSeats is to keep ticket-buying simple: to use efficient operations to provide the best possible prices to fans.

With lower prices, fans can go to more games. And with more fans at the games, Houston teams get the homefield advantage.

Plus, spending less on tickets means you get more money for merch and beer. That's a win-win.

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Building Houston

 
 

"The Soccer Innovation Institute presents the ultimate opportunity to redefine the player and fan experience, and develop a lasting legacy for the long-term benefit of the FIFA World Cup." Photo via Paul Duron/Wikipedia

Houston is kicking up its 2026 FIFA World Cup bid by a notch or two with a new innovative initiative.

The Houston 2026 World Cup Bid Committee on October 14 committed to establishing the nonprofit Soccer Innovation Institute if Houston becomes a host city for the FIFA World Cup.

"The institute will rely on Houston's spirit of innovation to create a united community investment in building a legacy that goes well beyond the city," according to a news release announcing the potential formation of the nonprofit.

The soccer institute, made up of a network of experts and leaders from various global organizations, would conduct specialized think tanks and would support a series of community programs.

"As the energy capital of the world, the global leader in medicine, the universal headquarters for NASA, and the home to numerous sports tech companies, Houston has an abundance of resources that are unmatched by other cities," Houston billionaire John Arnold, chairman of the 2026 bid committee, says in a news release. "By bringing these organizations together under one umbrella, the Soccer Innovation Institute presents the ultimate opportunity to redefine the player and fan experience, and develop a lasting legacy for the long-term benefit of the FIFA World Cup."

Houston Mayor Sylvester Turner says the institute would align with the city's efforts to build a strong ecosystem for innovation, along with its passion for soccer.

"Houston is recognized as a leader in technology and innovation. We have many innovation hubs around the city that bring bright minds into collaborative spaces where the whole is greater than the sum of the parts," the mayor says.

Held every four years, the World Cup assembles national men's soccer teams from around the world in one of the most planet's most watched sporting events. The traditional 32-team tournament will expand to 48 teams in 2026. After 2026, the World Cup might be staged every two years.

Among those collaborating on the Houston 2026 bid are NRG, the Texas Medical Center, Shell, Chevron, the U.S. Soccer Foundation, the Council for Responsible Sport, the Houston Dynamo, the Houston Dash, the City of Houston, Harris County, and Houston First.

The FIFA World Cup 2026 will be played in 16 cities across the U.S., Mexico, and Canada. Houston and Dallas are among the 17 cities vying to become a U.S. host. A final decision is expected in the first half of 2022. If Houston is selected, it will host six World Cup games at NRG Stadium.

Between October 21 and November 1, World Cup delegates will visit eight cities in the running to be North American hosts: Houston, Dallas, Kansas City, Cincinnati, Denver, San Francisco, Seattle, and Monterrey, Mexico.

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