teen-trepreneur

Houston-area teen scores golden investment from Kendra Scott on Shark Tank

Tyla-Simone Crayton got a big boost from Kendra Scott on Shark Tank. Photo courtesy of Shark Tank

A17-year-old entrepreneur from Missouri City has struck gold with her business, thanks to a Texas-based jewelry superstar.

Tyla-Simone Crayton, who is CEO of her wing-style sauce company Sienna Sauce, scored a $100,000 investment for her business on a recent episode of Shark Tank.

Austin-based jewelry and design maven, Kendra Scott, a guest on the show, took a chance on the Houston-area teen. In return, Scott, who boasts a billion-dollar brand, nets 20 percent of Crayton's company.

"I was so impressed with Tyla-Simone's creativity and drive during her pitch in the tank," Scott tells CultureMap. "As a fellow female entrepreneur and Texan, I'm excited to see our partnership grow."

Crayton first created her own wing-style sauce when she was a mere 8 years old. She and her family, who originally hail from Brooklyn, New York, started selling wings out of their Sienna Plantation home (hence the company name) and quickly hatched a plan for a business. She launched Sienna Sauce when she was 14.

"I would wake up Sunday mornings, hand-bottle the sauce, package it, and then sell it to my local community," Crayton told CultureMap news partner ABC13. "Once I got enough money from that, we were able to go to a professional manufacturer and get my sauce manufactured."

In the episode, Crayton credited Shark Tank for inspiring her to start a business and even harked to a time when her family was homeless. The Sharks were visibly moved and impressed; Scott praised the young entrepreneur, calling her "amazing," declaring, "I am the Shark for you," and promising help with distribution, shelf space, and more.

Sienna Sauce is available in three flavors: tangy, lemon pepper, and spicy. Currently, Clayton's products are available on Amazon and in more than 70 independent stores and chains across Texas and the U.S. — including five H-E-B stores in the Houston area.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

For over a year now, scientists have been testing wastewater for COVID-19. Now, the public can access that information. Photo via Getty Images

In 2020, a group of researchers began testing Houston's wastewater to collect data to help identify trends at the community level. Now, the team's work has been rounded up to use as an online resource.

The Houston Health Department and Rice University launched the dashboard on September 22. The information comes from samples collected from the city's 39 wastewater treatment plants and many HISD schools.

"This new dashboard is another tool Houstonians can use to gauge the situation and make informed decisions to protect their families," says Dr. Loren Hopkins, chief environmental science officer for the health department and professor in the practice of statistics at Rice University, in a news release. "A high level of virus in your neighborhood's wastewater means virus is spreading locally and you should be even more stringent about masking up when visiting public places."

The health department, Houston Water, Rice University, and Baylor College of Medicine originally collaborated on the wastewater testing. Baylor microbiologist Dr. Anthony Maresso, director of BCM TAILOR Labs, led a part of the research.

"This is not Houston's first infectious disease crisis," Maresso says in an earlier news release. "Wastewater sampling was pioneered by Joseph Melnick, the first chair of Baylor's Department of Molecular Virology and Microbiology, to get ahead of polio outbreaks in Houston in the 1960s. This work essentially ushered in the field of environmental virology, and it began here at Baylor. TAILOR Labs is just continuing that tradition by providing advanced science measures to support local public health intervention."

It's an affordable way to track the virus, says experts. People with COVID-19 shed viral particles in their feces, according to the release, and by testing the wastewater, the health department can measure important infection rate changes.

The dashboard, which is accessible online now, is color-coded by the level of viral load in wastewater samples, as well as labeled with any recent trend changes. Houstonians can find the interactive COVID-19 wastewater monitoring dashboard, vaccination sites, testing sites, and more information at houstonemergency.org/covid19.

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