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Report finds Houston venture capital firm has made the most Texas deals since 2010

Texas venture capital deals had its first spike in volume last year since 2013. Getty Images

When it comes to tracking venture capital deals coming out of Texas since 2010, a Houston fund tops the list — but just barely. Houston Angel Network edged out Austin-based Central Texas Angel Network by one deal.

The report by PitchBook counted deals from 2010 up to March 4 that were made with Texas companies. Ten VC funds were listed and, aside from HAN, Mercury Fund was the only other Houston VC. The other eight funds are located central Texas — with the exception of Right Side Capital Management, which has invested in 45 Texas companies since 2010.

"Texas is currently in a transition powered by high-tech investments that lie in contrast to the slow-paced cattle ranches spread throughout the rural areas of the country's 28th state," the report states. "Partly as a result of the relatively new tech scene, Texas was home to three of the 10 fastest-growing cities in the United States in 2018, according to Forbes."

According to the data, VC funding had been on a downward trend since 2013, when the state raked in $2.83 billion in 536 deals. However, 2018 marked a turn for the state with $3.11 billion in 461 deals — a smaller deal count compared to 2013.

Despite this VC deal growth, compared to the rest of the country, Texas ranks fourth when it comes to VC investment market share. California holds over 52 percent of the market, New York has over 10 percent, and Massachusetts has almost 10 percent itself, per PitchBook data. Meanwhile, Texas reportedly holds only 3.43 percent of the market.

PitchBook also identified the top 10 VC deals investing in Texas companies closed since the beginning of 2018 — none of which were into Houston companies. The list's top three had nine-figure investments — Austin-based Bungalo with a $250 million Series A, Dallas-based Peloton Therapeutics with a $150 million Series E, and Richardson, Texas-based Hedera Hashgraph with a $101 million Seed round.

Graph via PitchBook

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Building Houston

 
 

Koda Health, Houston, uses AI to help guide difficult conversations in health care, starting with end-of-life care planning. Image via kodahealthcare.com

A new Houston-based digital advanced care planning company is streamlining some of the most difficult conversations in the health care industry around palliative care.

Founded by Tatiana Fafanova, Dr. Desh Mohan, and Katelin Cherry, Koda Health uses AI to help patients create advance medical care directives and documents—such as a living will—through an easy to use web-based interface.

Koda Health uses a conversational platform where users can enter information about their values, living situations, quality of life wishes, and more while learning about different care options at their own speed. It also uses a proprietary machine learning approach that personalizes audio-video guided dialogue based on the patient's individual and cultural preferences.

The app then autogenerates legal and medical documents, which patients can notarize or electronically witness the forms through the app or on their own.

According to Fafanova, who earned her PhD in in Molecular Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine in Houston and now acts as the company's CEO, what historically has been a time consuming and expensive process, through Koda Health, takes an average of 17 minutes and is completely free of charge to the end user.

"We hope to reduce any outstanding barriers to access that might exist," Fafanova says. "It is very frequently the oldest and the poorest that are the highest utilizers of health care that don't have access to these solutions."

The app is also projected to save health care systems roughly $9,500 per patient per year, as it allows for hospitals and organizations to better plan for what their patient population is seeking in end-of-life-care.

The B2B platform was born out of the TMC's Biodesign Fellowship, which tasked Koda's founding members with finding solutions to issues surrounding geriatric care in the medical center. In March 2020, Koda incorporated. Not long after ICU beds began to fill with COVID-19 patients, "galvanizing" the team's mission, Fafanova says.

"It was no longer this conceptual thing that we needed to address and write a report on. Now it was that people were winding up in the hospital at alarming rates and none of those individuals had advanced care planning in place," she says.

After accelerating the development of the product, Koda Health is now being used by health care systems in Houston, Texas, and Virginia.

The company recently received a Phase I grant of $256,000 from the National Science Foundation, which will allow Koda to deploy the platform at Atrium Health Wake Forest Baptist and test it against phone conversations with 900 patients. Fafanova says the company will also use the funds to continue to develop personalization algorithms to improve Kona's interface for users.

"We want to make this a platform that mimics a high quality conversation," she says.

After Koda completes the Phase I pilot program it will then be eligible to apply for a Phase II award of up to $1 million in about a year.

Koda Health was founded by Tatiana Fafanova, Dr. Desh Mohan, and Katelin Cherry. Photos via kodahealthcare.com

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