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This is the hottest job in Houston for college grads, says new study

Petroleum engineers do well in Houston. Photo courtesy of Society for Petroleum Engineers

Are you a newly minted college grad searching for an in-demand job in Houston? If you're a petroleum engineer, you're in luck.

A study published May 27 by RentCafé, a platform for apartment rentals, shows the hottest job in Houston for college grads is petroleum engineer. RentCafé based its list of hot jobs on two factors: median pay and jobs per 1,000. The median pay for petroleum engineers in Houston is $178,240 and the rage of jobs per 1,000 is a mere 2.77

Austin? If you're a software developer, you're in luck.

As identified by RentCafé, here are the five hottest jobs in Houston for college grads:

  1. Petroleum engineer
  2. Sales manager
  3. Computer systems analyst
  4. Geoscientist
  5. Medical and health services manager

What follows are the hottest jobs for college grads in Texas' other major metro areas.

Austin
  1. Software developer / software quality assurance analyst and tester
  2. College education administrator
  3. Database administrator and architect
  4. Information security analyst
  5. Administrative services and facilities manager

Dallas-Fort Worth

  1. Sales manager
  2. Software developer / software quality assurance analyst and tester
  3. Information security analyst
  4. Medical and health services manager
  5. Computer systems analyst

San Antonio

  1. Medical and health services manager
  2. Software developer / software quality assurance analyst and tester
  3. Sales manager
  4. Computer systems analyst
  5. Nurse practitioner
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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Vanessa Wyche, director of the Johnson Space Center, gave the keynote address at this year's State of Space event. Screenshot via houston.org

Is the Space City poised to continue its reign as an innovative hub for space exploration? All signs point to yes, according to a group of experts.

The Greater Houston Partnership hosted its annual State of Space this week. The virtual event featured a keynote address from Vanessa Wyche, director of NASA Johnson Space Center, and a panel moderated by David Alexander, chair of aerospace and aviation committee at the GHP and the director of the Rice Space Institute.

The conversations focused on the space innovation activity happening in Houston, as well as an update on the industry as a whole has space commercialization continues to develop. All the speakers addressed how Houston has what it takes to remain a hub for the sector.

"The future looks very bright for Houston that we will remain a leader in Houston spaceflight," Wyche says in her address.

Here are a few other memorable moments from the event.

"Houston, I feel, is poised to be a leader. We have led in human space flight, and we will a leader in commercialization."

— Wyche says in her keynote address, which gave a thorough overview of what all NASA is working on at JSC. She calls out specifically how startups are a driving force in commercialization. JSC is working with local accelerator programs at The Ion and MassChallenge.

"These startups help us to connect to tomorrow's space innovation leaders, and gives our team the opportunity to mentor these entrepreneurs as we work to advance both our scientific and technical knowledge," she says.

"The ability to have a place where government, academia, and industry can come together and share ideas and innovation is incredibly powerful."

​— Steve Altemus, president and CEO of Intuitive Machines LLC, specifically talking about the Houston Spaceport, where Intuitive Machines has signed on as a tenant. Altemus adds that a major key to leading space commercialization is a trained workforce, which the spaceport is focused on cultivating.

"We shouldn't discount the character that Houston has from the standpoint as a great place to build a business."

— Tim Kopra, vice president of robotics and space at MDA Ltd., says, adding that Houston is a big city that feels like a small town. "We need to incentivize companies to come and stay," he says.

"Great cities — like great companies — understand that if you're still, you're probably moving backwards. ... I think Houston gets it in that regard."

— Todd May, senior vice president of science and space at KBR, says, adding that Houston realizes it needs to be on the offensive side to bring innovation to the game, positioning the city very well for the future.

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