M&A Moves

Houston-based edtech company makes international acquisition following strategic investments

Raptor Technologies, a Houston-based company providing safety-focused software to schools, has made an acquisition and announced new investment. Graphic via raptortech.com

A Houston company that provides school safety software to schools across the country has made a strategic acquisition.

Raptor Technologies announced last week that it has acquired United Kingdom-based CPOMS, which provides student safeguarding software to schools in the UK. Raptor reported that the M&A activity follows strategic investments from Chicago-based Thoma Bravo and existing investors JMI Equity, a Maryland-based firm, and New York-based Ares Capital. The terms of the deal were not disclosed.

"We are excited to add CPOMS best-in-class wellbeing products to Raptor's market-leading school safety product suite and to welcome the CPOMS team into the Raptor family," says Gray Hall, CEO of Raptor Technologies, in the press release. "Combining CPOMS software and domain expertise with Raptor further advances our mission to protect every child, every school, every day. We are eager to bring the proven capabilities of CPOMS to the US market and continue advancing CPOMS leadership position in the UK."

Raptor was founded to provide schools with a suite of software that can help implement safety across visitor, volunteer, and emergency management services. The software that the CPOMS platform provides targets reporting abuse, cyberbullying, and more.

"Raptor was the perfect fit for CPOMS. Both companies have dedicated themselves to keeping schools and students safe and share very similar cultures," says John Wild, managing director at CPOMS, in the release. "We at CPOMS are excited about joining the Raptor organization and look forward to the enhanced growth opportunities ahead."

Hall will lead the expanded organization, and Wild will transition to managing director of UK Operations for Raptor and CPOMS.

The acquisition was connected to Raptor's recent funding. The company did not disclose the amount raised.

"School safety needs in the US and UK continue to evolve, with solutions for managing the wellbeing and safety of students being paramount," says Adam Solomon, a principal at Thoma Bravo, in the release. "Through this investment and acquisition, we see tremendous potential for Raptor to extend its market leadership in K-12 school safety and its continued deployment of innovative solutions to schools in the US and UK."

The Houston company was founded in 2003. In 2018, Raptor received investment from JMI Equity.

"Combining CPOMS with Raptor creates a company with unique capabilities to help schools manage the safety and wellbeing of their students," says Bob Nye, general partner at JMI Equity, in the release. "We're excited about this acquisition and the strategic opportunity ahead."

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Building Houston

 
 

According to a new report, Houston's workforce isn't among the happiest in the nation. Photo via Getty Images

Call it the Bayou City Blues. A report from job website Lensa ranks Houston third among the U.S. cities with the unhappiest workers.

The report looks at four factors — vacation days taken, hours worked per week, average pay, and overall happiness — to determine the happiest and unhappiest cities for U.S. workers.

Lensa examined data for 30 major cities, including Dallas and San Antonio. Dallas appears at the top of the list of the cities with the unhappiest workers, and San Antonio lands at No. 8.

Minneapolis ranks first among the cities with the happiest workers.

Here's how Houston fared in the four ranking categories:

  • 16.6 million unused vacation days per year.
  • 40.1 average hours worked per week.
  • Median annual pay of $32,251.
  • Happiness score of out of 50.83.

Dallas had 19.4 million unused vacation days per year, 40.5 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $34,479, and a happiness score of 53.3 out of 100.

Meanwhile, San Antonio had 5.7 million unused vacation days per year, 39.2 average hours worked per week, median annual pay of $25,894, and a happiness score of 48.61.

Texas tops Lensa's list of the states with the unhappiest workers.

"While the Lone Star State had a decent happiness score of 52.56 out of 100, it scored poorly on each of the other factors, with Texans allowing an incredible 67.1 million earned vacation days go to waste over the course of a year," Lensa says.

In terms of general happiness, Houston shows up at No. 123 on WalletHub's most recent list of the happiest U.S. cities. Dallas takes the No. 104 spot, and San Antonio lands at No. 141. Fremont, California, grabs the No. 1 ranking.

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