Love Your Life

Popular Houston coworking space hosts event that's all about the hustle

Networking and collaboration are encouraged at WeWork. Photo courtesy of WeWork

If you have a side hustle — and these days, who doesn't? — you won't want to miss this event. WeWork and the Houston Rockets are hosting a party and panel discussion about the art of the side hustle and creating a life you love.

On February 27 from 6-8 pm at the WeWork in the Jones Building (708 Main St.), you can sip, snack, and listen as the panelists offer up their advice.

Set to share are CJ Paul, Chris Paul's brother and manager; Mario Elie, Houston Rockets legend and three-time NBA champion; Gretchen Sheirr, chief revenue officer for the Houston Rockets; David Gow, CEO of Gow Media, InnovationMap's parent company; and Roniel Bencosme, WeWork Houston's community director.

All attendees will be entered for a chance to win a basketball signed by the Houston Rockets players.

Paul is president of CP3, LLC, a nonprofit corporation founded in 2005 that strives to positively impact individuals and families by leveling the playing field in education, sports, and life. The foundation's emphasis on community involvement has won it the NBA's Community Assist Award three times in Chris Paul's 10-year career. The foundation partners with Feed the Children, Make-A-Wish, Salvation Army, B&G Clubs, LA's Best Afterschool programs, Leapz & Bounds, and a number of other organizations. Paul is also managing partner of Ohh Dip!!! Productions and oversees CP3 Basketball Academy.

Elie was drafted in 1985 by the Milwaukee Bucks and played 11 seasons before retiring. He won two NBA championships with the Houston Rockets in 1994 and '95, and then another with the San Antonio Spurs in '99. In 2007, Elie was inducted in the New York Basketball Hall of Fame, and was named one of the top 10 players in Houston Rockets history. That same year, Elie began his coaching career with the Dallas Mavericks and currently works as an assistant coach for the Orlando Magic.

Now in her 18th season with the Houston Rockets, and her third as CRO, Sheirr is responsible for the sales, service, and overall revenue strategy for the organization. In 2017, Sheirr was named one of Sports Business Journal's Forty Under 40, which annually recognizes the top young professionals in sports business. She is also a founding board member of WISE Houston, serves on the board of Target Hunger, and is a member of the Executive Women's Partnership.

Not only is Gow head of InnovationMap's parent company, but he also oversees CultureMap, SportsMap, and GiftingMap, and he owns the highest-rated sports radio station in Houston, ESPN 97.5FM, and SB Nation Radio, one of the country's largest national sports radio networks. Prior to entering the media business, Gow was first CFO and ultimately the CEO of Ashford.com, a company that grew from $1.2 million up to over $50 million in revenue. As CFO, Gow managed a successful IPO, raising over $75 million with Goldman Sachs as the lead underwriter. As CEO, Gow grew a profitable corporate gifts business to complement the company's e-tailing business. Ashford.com was sold to GSI Commerce in 2002.

Come early or stick around to check out this WeWork location, which is housed in a building full of history. The Great Jones Building originally housed offices for Texaco when it first opened in 1908, but now, more than a century later, WeWork claimed it as its first Houston location.

A modern layout gets a few Art Deco touches — a nod to the JP Morgan Chase building next door — along with an impressive collection of local artwork. Incredible views, cozy coffee corners, a new-mothers' room, and micro-roast coffee, fresh fruit water, and draught craft beer are just a few of the awesome amenities that WeWork members can enjoy.

Reserve your free Side Hustle tickets here.

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Building Houston

 
 

Auburn University's SwiftSku took first place in this year's virtually held Rice Business Plan Competition, but it was the second place company that went home with over half a million in cash and investment prizes. Photo via rice.edu

In its 21st year, the Rice Business Plan Competition hosted 54 student-founded startups from all over the world — its largest batch of companies to date — and doled out over $1.4 million in cash and investment prizes at the week-long virtual competition.

RBPC, which is put on by the Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship, took place Tuesday, April 6, to Friday, April 9 this year. Just like 2020, RBPC was virtually held. The competition announced the 54 participating startups last month, and coordinated the annual elevator pitches, a semi-finals round, wildcard round and live final pitches. The contestants also received virtual networking and mentoring.

Earlier this week, Rice Alliance announced the seven student-led startups that then competed in the finals. From this pack, the judges awarded the top prizes. Here's how the finalists placed and what won:

  • SwiftSku from Auburn University, point of sales technology for convenience stores that allows for real time analytics, won first place and claimed the $350,000 grand prize from Goose Capital. The company also won the $50,000 Business Angel Minority Association Prize, the $500 Best Digital Elevator Pitch Prize from Mercury Fund, and the $500 Third Place Anbarci Family People's Choice prize, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $401,000. The company also won the CFO Consulting Prize, a $25,000 in-kind award.
  • AgZen from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, a pesticide alternative spray and formulation technology company, won the second place $100,000 investment prize (awarded by Finger Interests, Anderson Family Fund, Greg Novak, and Tracy Druce). The startup also won a $300,000 Owl Investment Prize, the $100,000 Houston Angel Network Prize, the $500 Best Energy Elevator Pitch Prize from Mercury Fund, and the $1,500 Third Place Anbarci Family People's Choice prize, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $502,000. The company also won the $30,000 in-kind Polsinelli Energy Prize.
  • FibreCoat GmbH from RWTH Aachen University, a startup with patented spinning technology for the production of inexpensive high-performance composite fibers, won the third place $50,000 investment prize (also awarded by Finger Interests, Anderson Family Fund, Greg Novak, and Tracy Druce). The company also won the $100,000 TiE Houston Angels Prize and the $500 Best Hard Tech Elevator Pitch Prize from Mercury Fund, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $150,500.
  • Candelytics from Harvard University, a startup building the digital infrastructure for 3-D data, won the fourth place $5,000 prize.
  • OYA FEMTECH Apparel from UCLA, an athletic wear company that designs feminine health-focused clothing, won the fifth place $5,000 prize. The company also won the $5,000 Eagle Investors Prize, the $25,000 Urban Capital Network Prize, and the $1,000 Second Place Anbarci Family People's Choice prize, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $36,000.
  • LFAnt Medical from McGill University , an innovative and tech-backed STI testing company, won the sixth place $5,000 prize and the $20,000 Johnson and Johnson Innovation Prize, bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $25,000.
  • SimpL from the University of Pittsburgh, an AI-backed fitness software company, won the seventh place $5,000 prize. The company also won the $25,000 Spirit of Entrepreneurship Prize from the Pearland Economic Development Corp., bringing the company's grand total in cash and investment prizes to $30,000.

Some of the competition's participating startups outside of the seven finalists won monetary and in-kind prizes. Here's a list of those.

  • Mercury Fund's Elevator Pitch Prizes also included:
    • Best Life Science $500 Prize to Blue Comet Medical Solutions from Northwestern University
    • Best Consumer $500 Prize to EasyFlo from the University of New Mexico
    • Best Overall $1,000 prize to Anthro Energy from Stanford University
  • The Palo Alto Software Outstanding LivePlan Pitch $3,000 Prize went to LiRA Inc. from the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill
  • The OFW Law FDA Regulatory Strategy Prize, a $20,000 in-kind award went to Paldara Inc. from Oklahoma State University.
  • The Silver Fox Mentoring Prize, which included $20,000 in kind prizes to three winners selected Ai-Ris from Texas A&M University, BruxAway from the University of Texas, and Karkinex from Rice University as recipients.
  • The first, second, and third place winners also each received the legal service prize from Baker Botts for a total of $20,000 in-kind award.
  • The Courageous Women Entrepreneurship Prize from nCourage — a $50,000 investment prize — went to Shelly Xu Design from Harvard University.
  • The SWPDC Pediatric Device Prize — usually a $50,000 investment divided its prize to two winners to receive $25,000 each
    • Blue Comet Medical Solutions from Northwestern University
    • Neurava from Purdue University
  • TMC Innovation Healthcare Prize awarded a $100,000 investment prize and admission into its accelerator to ArchGuard from Duke University
  • The Artemis Fund awarded its $100,000 investment prize to Kit Switch from Stanford University
The awards program concluded with a plan to host the 22nd annual awards in 2022 in person.

If you missed the virtual programming, each event was hosted live on YouTube and the videos are now available on the Rice Alliance's page.

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