Recession-proof your business with 60+ speakers at online-savvy conference

Online-First co-founder Moby Hayat. Courtesy photo

When project manager Moby Hayat was laid off this past March, he looked around and saw fellow entrepreneur friends losing revenue, having their product or service become obsolete overnight, and frantically hustling to survive.

"The world was quickly changing," he says. "Massive layoffs, extreme budget cuts, and grim stories of loss. But as in every recession, there are businesses which find a way to adapt and grow. In 2020, those businesses will be the ones that are entrenched in online customer acquisition, selling their products and services in the virtual world, and see this as an opportunity to grow."

So Hayat and his business partner Austin Larson, the CMO of an Inc. 500 company, decided to put their skills and knowledge to use.

They, along with entrepreneur CJ Finley, are hosting Online-First Summit 2020 from May 11-14. It's sponsored by Tixpire, ThriveOn, podcast The Fireshow, and InnovationMap.

The four-day virtual conference is geared toward those who have lost business due to the current economic crisis, been negatively impacted by social distancing, are looking to shift to online sales, and who want to expand or build new digital revenue streams.

More than 60 speakers will be talking live and in recorded sessions about best practices for e-commerce, how to organically build a following, the state of the job market, how to avoid layoffs, ways to deeply connect with your customers in an online-only world, and how to make money online as a creator "without selling your soul," among other topics.

Not only will adapting to the post-COVID business world be discussed, but also how companies can learn from this time and apply lessons to the unknown future.

Hayat and the team's previous work has featured Mayor Adler, SXSW director Hugh Forrest, the designer of Austin-Bergstrom International Airport, the Texas Woman Entrepreneur of the Year, and included collaborations with Funded House, Entrepreneur Media, and MediaTech Ventures.

Head here to see the full four-day lineup, browse the list of speakers, and book your space.

General admission tickets are $35 and include access to live broadcasts and replays until July 31, 2020. VIP tickets come with an execution planner, custom swag pack, content marketing course, one-hour consultation, and access to live broadcasts and replays until December 31, 2020.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

From software and IoT to decarbonization and nanotech, here's what 10 energy tech startups you should look out for. Photo via Getty Images

This week, energy startups pitched virtually for venture capitalists — as well as over 1,000 attendees — as a part of Rice Alliance for Technology and Entrepreneurship's 18th annual Energy and Clean Tech Venture Forum.

At the close of the three-day event, Rice Alliance announced its 10 most-promising energy tech companies. Here's which companies stood out from the rest.

W7energy

Based in Delaware, W7energy has created a zero-emission fuel cell electric vehicle technology supported by PiperION polymers. The startup's founders aim to provide a more reliable green energy that is 33 percent cheaper to make.

"With ion exchange polymer, we can achieve high ionic conductivity while maintaining mechanical strength," the company's website reads. "Because of the platform nature of the chemistry, the chemical and physical properties of the polymer membranes can be tuned to the desired application."

Modumetal

Modumetal, which has its HQ in Washington and an office locally as well, is a nanotechnology company focused on improving industrial materials. The company was founded in 2006 by Christina Lomasney and John Whitaker and developed a patented electrochemical process to produce nanolaminated metal alloys, according to Modumetal's website.

Tri-D Dynamics

San Francisco-based Tri-D Dynamics has developed a suite of smart metal products. The company's Bytepipe product claims to be the world's first smart casing that can collect key information — such as leak detection, temperatures, and diagnostic indicators — from underground and deliver it to workers.

SeekOps

A drone company based in Austin, SeekOps can quickly retrieve and deliver emissions data for its clients with its advance sensor technology. The company, founded in 2017, uses its drone and sensor pairing can help reduce emissions at a low cost.

Akselos

Switzerland-based Akselos has been using digital twin technology since its founding in 2012 to help energy companies analyze their optimization within their infrastructure.

Osperity

Osperity, based in Houston's Galleria area, is a software company that uses artificial intelligence to analyze and monitor industrial operations to translate the observations into strategic intelligence. The technology allows for cost-effective remote monitoring for its clients.

DroneDeploy

DroneDeploy — based in San Francisco and founded in 2013 — has raised over $92 million (according to Crunchbase) for its cloud-based drone mapping and analytics platform. According to the website, DroneDeploy has over 5,000 clients worldwide across oil and gas, construction, and other industries.

HEBI Robotics

Pittsburgh-based HEBI Robotics gives its clients the tools to build custom robotics. Founded 2014, HEBI has clients — such as NASA, Siemens, Ericsson — across industries.

CarbonFree Chemicals

CarbonFree Chemicals, based in San Antonio and founded in 2016, has created a technology to turn carbon emissions to useable solid carbonates.

SensorUp

Canadian Internet of Things company, SensorUp Inc. is a location intelligence platform founded in 2011. The technology specializes in real-time analysis of industrial operations.

"Whether you are working with legacy systems or new sensors, we provide an innovative platform that brings your IoT together for automated operations and processes," the company's website reads.

Trending News