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Rescheduled: These are the can't-miss events to attend each day during Houston Climate Week

The city is hosting a series of virtual events focusing on climate issues Houston is facing. Here's what streams you cannot miss. Photo via Getty Images

Editor's note — This story has been updated and republished to reflect the new dates and details of Houston Climate Week.

The city of Houston is kicking off its rescheduled Houston Climate Week after the original week was postponed by threats of Hurricane Laura. The week-long virtual program supports Mayor Sylvester Turner's Climate Action Plan, which launched in April in response to Hurricane Harvey and other recent major climate events.

"We recognized how we just couldn't continue to do things as we had done them in the past — Harvey was a game changer," Turner says at the opening conversation of Houston Climate Week. "It set us up for enacting the city's first Climate Action Plan."

Every day between Monday, September 14, to Friday, September 18, the city will host two to three virtual events. For the full schedule, click here. Below are the can't-miss events on the agenda.

Monday, September 14 — CLIMATE CHANGE: What does the future hold for Houston?

Katharine Hayhoe, climate specialist at Texas Tech University, will discuss future climate patterns and findings from her Houston Climate Impact Assessment.

The conversation begins at 1 pm on Monday, September 14, and those who register for the event can join online.

Tuesday, September 15 — ENERGY TRANSITION: Making Houston a Global Leader in Energy Innovation

A panel of experts have been tasked with discussing innovation in the energy industry. Joining the conversation is Kelsey Hultberg of Sunnova Energy, Juliana Garaizar of Greentown Labs Houston, Jose Beceiro of Global Energy 2.0, and Carolyn Seto of IHS Markit.

The conversation begins at 11 am on Tuesday, September 15, and those who register for the event can join online.

Wednesday, September 16 — TRANSPORTATION: Taking the Car Out of Carbon Emissions

Nearly half of Houston's greenhouse gas emissions come from transportation and 96 percent of commuters drive alone. Kimberly Williams, David Fields, Jonathan Brooks, and Kurt Barrow will explore pathways to a greener, safer, and more equitable mobility future for Houstonians.

The conversation begins at 11 am on Wednesday, September 16, and those who register for the event can join online.

Thursday, September 17 — RESILIENCE: 2020: The COVID, Climate, & Equity Connection

Whether it is climate change or COVID-19, a city's primary responsibility is to protect our most vulnerable. For Houston, that means fighting a global pandemic in the middle of a heat wave and hurricane season. This year has reinforced the connection between climate and community health. Community recovery and resilience leaders will discuss the impact COVID-19 and climate change have on Houston's most vulnerable populations and how to build more sustainable, resilient, and complete communities.

The conversation begins at 1 pm on Thursday, September 17, and those who register for the event can join online.

Friday, September 18 — CLOSING CONVERSATION: Partnerships and Pathways to Decarbonize Cities

Round out the week of programing with a final discussion with Mayor Turner, who will be joined by David Lawler of BP America, and Daniel Yergin of IHS Markit. They will be discussing the importance of partnerships in Houston's commitment to carbon neutrality by 2050.

The conversation begins at 1 pm on Friday, September 18, and those who register for the event can join online.

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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