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Recent legislation brings budding CBD and hemp convention to Houston this fall

CBD is becoming a booming business in Boomtown. CBD American Shaman

Look out, California and Colorado. The recent passing of Texas' House Bill 1325 means that the Lone Star State is now poised to be the largest hemp-producing state in the nation.

To wit: Texas already boasts more than 1,500 licenses and more than 1,100 lot permits already issued, making the state a major hemp hub.

So it's fitting that a budding new convention centered on all things hemp and CBD and hemp will head to Houston. The Lucky Leaf Expo will run November 5-6 at NRG Center, organizers announced.

Attendees can look forward to more than 120 exhibitors, more than 40 speakers, panels, and more. "Cooking with Cannabis" demos promise to be an interesting draw.

Planners also plan to fire up a pre-show Cannabis Business Crash Course.

Tickets can be purchased online and at the convention center during the event.

"We have a diverse array of exhibitors in every channel of the CBD/hemp industry that specialize in the sale of seeds, CPAs, attorneys, accountants, processors, manufacturers, soft gel companies, to help get you started for your business," Chad Sloan of Lucky Leaf Expo noted in a statement.

As Forbes pointed out last year, after being legalized in 2018, hemp is already one of America's top ten agricultural crops. CBD is now a $2 billion industry: Its medical applications are booming; food products also promise to be huge.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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