Guest column

How Houston small businesses can stand out when competing for in-demand talent

A Houston HR expert shares three tips for hiring top talent in a competitive market. Photo via Getty Images

As the economic recovery gears up, small business owners increasingly need to hire and retain the best talent available in their industry. The challenge for small- and medium-sized business owners is how to compete with large corporations that offer competitive compensation and benefits packages. The key is appealing to top-notch talent in a historically deep candidate pool -- and company culture can help small businesses stand out.

It has been proven that when small business owners concentrate on culture, identify what motivates employees and enjoy getting the job done, top-notch talent will follow.

Below are a few ideas for how small businesses can complete for top-notch talent:

Shape a winning company culture

Company culture means more than state-of-the-art facilities and amenities like free snacks. Company culture is an experience that will become part of the employee identity. Culture embodies many aspects of the organization including opportunities for advancement, company leadership and values. These details and more can shape a company's culture.

Small business owners also should try to look beyond the job description to identify like-minded individuals who align with the company's values. Employees who are strongly aligned with the company's mission can foster a positive workplace and a team that is happy, engaged, productive and committed. Top performers will be much more inclined to join the team and stay for longer tenures when given an opportunity to develop and advance in an uplifting environment.

Get attention with uncommon benefits

Agility is a tremendous advantage that small businesses have over their larger counterparts in the competition for top talent. Benefits unique to small businesses include accessible senior leadership and quick timelines for advancement. These and other advantages to small businesses can tip talent in their favor in lieu of the potential competition's higher salary.

Today, more traditional benefits have progressed to include mental, physical and emotional health and wellbeing. Small businesses can consider creating or updating an Employee Assistance Program (EAP). Through an EAP, employers can offer unique benefits such as online therapy sessions or meditation apps. Additional offerings can include telemedicine services, expanded sick-leave, financial wellness programs or childcare assistance. Even more generous programs include online fitness subscriptions, free food delivery, streaming services memberships or reimbursement for remote-work expenses such as home office supplies.

Look for skills from other industries

As the post-pandemic economic landscape continues to evolve, talent acquisition is evolving with it. If recruiting for a new position, small business owners may find highly qualified individuals who may be seeking a career change or looking to tap into a new industry. It is important for small business owners to be open to experience across industries, which can bring new depth to a team.

Competing for top-notch talent is one of the many challenges for small businesses. By evaluating company culture and how it impacts employees at their core, small business owners will be on par to compete with large corporations for the ideal candidate. And once on board, quality employees will want to stay.

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Jill Chapman is a senior performance consultant with Insperity, a leading provider of human resources and business performance solutions.

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Building Houston

 
 

Emily Cisek, CEO and co-founder of The Postage, joins the Houston Innovators Podcast to discuss tech optimizing after-life planning, B-to-C startup challenges, and a national expansion. Photo courtesy of The Postage

Anyone who's ever lost a loved one knows how stressful the process can be. Not only are you navigating your own grief, but you're bombarded with decisions you have to make. And if that loved one wasn't prepared — as most aren't — then the process is more overwhelming than it needs to be.

On top of that, Emily Cisek realized — through navigating three family deaths back to back — how archaic of a process it was. Rather than wait and see if anything changed, Cisek jumped on the market opportunity.

"I just knew there had to be a better way, and that's why I started The Postage," Cisek, co-founder and CEO of the Houston-based company, says on this week's episode of the Houston Innovators Podcast. "My background had historically been in bringing offline businesses online, and I started doing some research on how I could make this space better. At the time, there really wasn't anything out there."

The tech-enabled platform allows users of all ages to plan for their demise in every way — from saving and sharing memories when the time comes to organizing pertinent information for the loved ones left behind. And, as of last month, users can no generate their own last will and testament.

"We launched the online will maker — it wasn't in my roadmap for another six months or so — because every single person that was coming in was looking at something else on our platform, but then going to the will part and asking, 'Hey is this something I can create here?'" Cisek says.

Recognizing that this was a good opportunity to generate new users, Cisek quickly added on the feature for a flat $75 fee. Then, members pay $3.99 a month to be able to edit their will whenever they need to and also receive access to everything else on the platform.

Cisek saw a huge opportunity to grow with the pandemic, which put a spotlight after-life planning. The silver lining of it all was that more people were discussing after-life planning with their family members.

"We're having more open dialogue about life and end-of-life planning that I don't see any other scenario really bringing that to light," she explains. "In some ways, it's been positive because having the conversation with people has been easier than it had been before."

While anyone can access The Postage's platform, Cisek says she's focused on getting the word out nationally. Following some imminent funding and partnerships, national marketing and growth campaigns are on the horizon.

Cisek shares more on her career and he unique challenges she faces as a B-to-C entrepreneur on the podcast. Listen to the full interview below — or wherever you stream your podcasts — and subscribe for weekly episodes.


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