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Houston expert: How to safely promote holiday cheer in the workplace

The holidays are here — but how can you foster in-office holiday cheer and keep it safe in a COVID-19 world? Here are some tips. Photo via Getty Images

With the 2020 winter holiday rapidly approaching, time is running short to plan festivities that are fun, engaging — and safe — amid a global coronavirus pandemic.

While many companies are planning to forego holiday parties this year, there is a strong case to be made that it is more important now than ever to host something special for employees.

It would be difficult to find a company that hasn't somehow been impacted by the coronavirus pandemic. As companies have had to be nimble, reacting to rapidly changing environments, the work aimed at staying relevant and profitable has likely been carried out by loyal employees dedicated to ensuring success. Whether they pivoted to work-from-home, often using their personal resources and spaces to get the job done in sometimes-difficult environments, or they stayed on the front lines as the coronavirus circulated in their communities, employees should be heralded as the year's MVP.

Business leaders should consider hosting holiday celebrations that honor their employees and align with their ongoing safety protocols. For companies that continue to conduct in-person business, holiday celebrations may be safely held outside in Houston's temperate climate. For companies that plan to proceed with virtual celebrations, think outside the box for developing an event that colleagues will enjoy.

Virtual events open up new opportunities

Particularly for companies that have hosted lavish year-end parties but who are concerned about safety, consider providing an unforgettable experience for your employees while they come together separately.

Hire an engaging expert to take your staff on a virtual culinary or cocktail adventure — it might be a mixologist, sommelier, cicerone or chef. Send a curated package containing everything they'll need: cheese board and a mix of local meats, cheeses, nuts, and olives. The expert can teach the co-workers how to assemble a charcuterie board or delve into the history of various cheeses and which wines would pair well. Another might teach how to construct a craft cocktail.

If you are looking for something a bit more cheeky, consider hosting a virtual cookie-decorating event complemented by an ugly-sweater contest. Or, hire a local band to perform a private, virtual concert just for the company.

There is also a host of companies that are working in the virtual space, creating turnkey events that include games, delivered gift boxes and other methods of bringing teams together when they're physically separated. Consider holding such events during work hours: Employees will likely be more willing to participate, and it doubles as a holiday gift that provides a fleeting workday distraction during typically slower periods.

Even for companies with sizable staffs, for those that generally host extravagant parties, these virtual events may cost less than normal holiday celebrations.

Hosting safe in-person events

For companies planning on hosting socially distant in-person celebrations, consider using parking lots to ensure everyone has enough space to stay safe and enjoy themselves. Forego buffet service and either use a catering staff wearing masks and gloves to serve food, or use pre-packaged food and beverages to reduce risk.

Live music or other artistic performances can be a welcomed event during these times.

Or, if there's a desire to bring people together but concerns about safety, consider hosting a drive-in movie for employees and their families. Companies specialize in providing the necessary equipment for such events, and attendees can pick up a goodie box with prepackaged food and drinks to enjoy while the event takes place.

The keys to success are ensuring the events are safe and accessible to everyone who wants to participate, that they provide employees with a feeling of gratitude from their employer and, these days, a nod to the unparalleled times we are facing. Whether companies spend lavishly this year, or reduce cost but still provide heart-felt events, employees will feel the sense of gratitude and appreciation, and that's a big win heading into 2021.

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Jill Chapman is a senior performance consultant with Insperity,a leading provider of human resources and business performance solutions.

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Dr. Peter Hotez and Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi have been recognized by Fast Company for their leadership in developing low-cost COVID vaccine. Photo courtesy of Texas Children's

This week, Fast Company announced its 14th annual list of Most Creative People in Business — and two notable Houstonians made the cut.

Dr. Peter Hotez and his fellow dean of the National School of Tropical Medicine at Baylor College of Medicine, Dr. Maria Elena Bottazzi, were named among the list for “open sourcing a COVID-19 Vaccine for the rest of the world.” The list, which recognizes individuals making a cultural impact via bold achievements in their field, is made up of influential leaders in business.

Hotez and Bottazzi are also co-directors for the Texas Children's Hospital's Center for Vaccine Development -one of the most cutting-edge vaccine development centers in the world. For the past two decades it has acquired an international reputation as a non-profit Product Development Partnership (PDP), advancing vaccines for poverty-related neglected tropical diseases (NTDs) and emerging infectious diseases of pandemic importance. One of their most notable achievements is the development of a vaccine technology leading to CORBEVAX, a traditional, recombinant protein-based COVID-19 vaccine.

"It's an honor to be recognized not only for our team's scientific efforts to develop and test low cost-effective vaccines for global health, but also for innovation in sustainable financing that goes beyond the traditional pharma business model," says Hotez in a statement.

The technology was created and engineered by Texas Children's Center for Vaccine Development specifically to combat the worldwide problem of vaccine access and availability. Biological E Limited (BE) developed, produced and tested CORBEVAX in India where over 60 million children have been vaccinated so far.

Earlier this year, the doctors were nominated for the 2022 Nobel Peace Prize for their research and vaccine development of the vaccine. Its low cost, ease of production and distribution, safety, and acceptance make it well suited for addressing global vaccine inequity.

"We appreciate the recognition of our efforts to begin the long road to 'decolonize' the vaccine development ecosystem and make it more equitable. We hope that CORBEVAX becomes one of a pipeline of new vaccines developed against many neglected and emerging infections that adversely affect global public health," says Bottazzi in the news release from Texas Children's.

Fast Company editors and writers research candidates for the list throughout the year, scouting every business sector, including technology, medicine, engineering, marketing, entertainment, design, and social good. You can see the complete list here

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