in it to win it

InnovationMap reveals the winners of our inaugural awards

The inaugural InnovationMap Awards revealed its big winners across eight categories and honored its Trailblazer Award recipient. Photos courtesy

The votes are in — and it's time to announce the winners of the inaugural InnovationMap Awards, presented by Techwave.

The event, held September 8 at The Cannon, honored all 28 finalists, spanning innovative Houston companies and founders, as well as our first-ever Trailblazer Award recipient, Barbara Burger. Click here to read about all the finalists.

Eight judges evaluated over 100 applications across eight categories for the 2021 InnovationMap Awards presented by Techwave. This year's judges included: Juliana Garaizar, head of the Houston incubator and vice president of innovation at Greentown Labs; Alex Gras, managing director at The Cannon; Rajasekhar Gummadapu, co-founder and CEO of Techwave; Natalie Harms, editor of InnovationMap; Serafina Lalany, interim president at Houston Exponential; Jon Nordby, managing director at MassChallenge; Emily Reiser, senior manager of innovation community engagement at the Texas Medical Center; and Grace Rodriguez, CEO and executive director of Impact Hub Houston.

Want to watch the event in full? Click here.

Without further adieu, here are our 2021 InnovationMap Award winners.

Hello Alice is a small business owner's passport through entrepreneurship that helps with networking, raising capital, and accessing growth tools. The company was also nominated for the People's Choice: Startup of the Year Award and the Female-Founded Business categories.

Topl is an impact monetization engine that enables digital and sustainable transformation across value chains and empowers the monetization of impact verified on the Topl Blockchain. The company was also nominated for the People's Choice: Startup of the Year Award.

Saranas is the creator of the Early Bird, the first and only FDA-approved bleed detection system for endovascular procedures.

Nanotech is a material science company with a mission to fireproof the world and reduce energy consumption. Nanotech was also a finalist for the People's Choice category.

Mainline is an esports tournament management system, tournament organizer, and event production company.

Cemvita Factory — engineering microbes that eat CO2 and produce valuable chemicals. The company was also a finalist in the Energy Transition Business category.

Kim Roxie of LAMIK Beauty — a tech-enabled clean color cosmetics company focusing on women of all diverse backgrounds. LAMIK was also a finalist in the BIPOC-Founded Business category,

The inaugural InnovationMap Awards event, which is about three weeks away, was created to honor the best of Houston innovation. The Trailblazer Award in particular was established to honor a Houston innovation leader and advocate who's making a lasting impact on the Houston innovation community.

Barbara Burger, vice president of innovation at Chevron and president of Chevron Technology Ventures, was selected to receive the 2021 Trailblazer Award at the InnovationMap Awards presented by Techwave. Burger was nominated and approved by this year's judges. Click here to read more about the Trailblazer Award.

And the winner is.... Cheers Health, which is creating products that are designed to support your liver and help you feel better after consuming alcohol.

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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