Break the Code

How software salaries measure up across tech-savvy Texas cities

Flatiron School has graduated thousands of students since its founding in 2012. Photo courtesy of WeWork

Texas may not have the tech reputation of Silicon Valley or Seattle, but it's definitely making strides. Houston, Austin, Dallas, and San Antonio are rapidly growing into tech hubs, and the Lone Star State should absolutely make the shortlist if you're seeking a well-paying software engineer position.

According to job and salary websites Indeed and Glassdoor, both entry-level and senior-level software engineering salaries are competitive throughout the state. Web developer jobs in Texas are projected to grow 20 percent — compared to the national average of 15 percent — between 2016 and 2026.

Austin leads both levels in overall salary, but it's important to keep in mind that cost of living there is higher as well. Entry-level employees can expect to make an average of $69,342 while senior staffers can climb to $121,302.

Dallas is next, with junior workers bringing in $68,314 and senior developers making an average of $115, 212. Houston and San Antonio are pretty similar, offering engineers who are just starting out an average of $64,194 (H-town) and $65,596 (Alamo City) and more experienced workers $114,686 and $111,369, respectively.

Houston is the most populous city in Texas — and the fourth most in the nation — and that increases the demand for tech talent. While the city lost jobs in 2018, the number of tech job postings actually increased 140 percent year-over-year, based on a report by CompTIA. Software engineer/web developer employment increased 2.1 percent year-over-year in the same report, and are projected to grow 5.9 percent between 2018 and 2026.

Need to brush up your skills, or wondering how to break into the industry? Flatiron School, WeWork's coding school, helps people pivot into tech careers. Flatiron School's on-campus and online immersive courses have a proven track record of impressive employment outcomes and include dedicated career coaching, employment support, and a money-back guarantee (see terms here). Some of its Texas grads have gotten jobs at JP Morgan Chase, National Oilwell Varco (NOV), iland Cloud, ScaleFactor, and Infosys.

Since its founding in 2012, Flatiron School has graduated thousands of students. Its software engineering and data science immersive programs each run for 15 weeks, and the school is committed to creating a more inclusive tech culture with the Women Take Tech and Diversity Initiatives. By creating community through conversations, Flatiron School has been able to provide scholarships for women through its partnerships with Lyft, Birchbox, and SeatGeek, as well as for people of color, military families, and the LGBTQ community.

Check out this list of upcoming events held at the WeWork Houston campus at 708 Main St., schedule a campus tour, or apply today.

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Building Houston

 
 

With Clutch, connecting brands with creators has never been easier and more inclusive. Photo courtesy of Clutch

An app that originally launched on Houston college campuses has announced it's now live nationwide.

Clutch founders Madison Long and Simone May set out to make it easier for the younger generation to earn money with their skill sets. After launching a beta at local universities last fall, Clutch's digital marketplace is now live for others to join in.

The platform connects brands to its network of creators for reliable and authentic work — everything from social media management, video creation, video editing, content creation, graphic design projects, and more. With weekly payments to creators and an inclusive platform for users on both sides of the equation, Clutch aims to make digital collaboration easier and more reliable for everyone.

“We’re thrilled to bring our product to market to make sustainable, authentic lifestyles available to everyone through the creator economy," says May, CTO and co-founder of Clutch. "We’re honored to be part of the thriving innovation community here in Houston and get to bring more on-your-own-terms work opportunities to all creators and businesses through our platform.”

In its beta, Clutch facilitated collaborations for over 200 student creators and 50 brands — such as DIGITS and nama. The company is founded with a mission of "democratizing access to information and technology and elevating the next generation for all people," according to a news release from Clutch. In the beta, 75 percent of the creators were people of color and around half of the businesses were owned by women and people of color.

“As a Clutch Creator, I set my own pricing, schedule and services when collaborating on projects for brands,” says Cathy Syfert, a creator through Clutch. “Clutch Creators embrace the benefits of being a brand ambassador as we create content about the products we love, but do it on behalf of the brands to help the brands grow authentically."

The newly launched product has the following features:

  • Creator profile, where users can share their services, pricing, and skills and review inquiries from brands.
  • Curated matching from the Clutch admin team.
  • Collab initiation, where users can accept or reject incoming collab requests with brands.
  • Collab management — communication, timing, review cycles — all within the platform.
  • In-app payments with a weekly amount selected by the creators themselves.
  • Seamless cancellation for both brands and creators.
Clutch raised $1.2 million in seed funding from Precursor Ventures, Capital Factory, HearstLab, and more. Clutch was originally founded as Campus Concierge in 2021 and has gone through the DivInc Houston program at the Ion.

Madison Long, left, and Simone May co-founded Clutch. Photo courtesy of Clutch

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