Break the Code

How software salaries measure up across tech-savvy Texas cities

Flatiron School has graduated thousands of students since its founding in 2012. Photo courtesy of WeWork

Texas may not have the tech reputation of Silicon Valley or Seattle, but it's definitely making strides. Houston, Austin, Dallas, and San Antonio are rapidly growing into tech hubs, and the Lone Star State should absolutely make the shortlist if you're seeking a well-paying software engineer position.

According to job and salary websites Indeed and Glassdoor, both entry-level and senior-level software engineering salaries are competitive throughout the state. Web developer jobs in Texas are projected to grow 20 percent — compared to the national average of 15 percent — between 2016 and 2026.

Austin leads both levels in overall salary, but it's important to keep in mind that cost of living there is higher as well. Entry-level employees can expect to make an average of $69,342 while senior staffers can climb to $121,302.

Dallas is next, with junior workers bringing in $68,314 and senior developers making an average of $115, 212. Houston and San Antonio are pretty similar, offering engineers who are just starting out an average of $64,194 (H-town) and $65,596 (Alamo City) and more experienced workers $114,686 and $111,369, respectively.

Houston is the most populous city in Texas — and the fourth most in the nation — and that increases the demand for tech talent. While the city lost jobs in 2018, the number of tech job postings actually increased 140 percent year-over-year, based on a report by CompTIA. Software engineer/web developer employment increased 2.1 percent year-over-year in the same report, and are projected to grow 5.9 percent between 2018 and 2026.

Need to brush up your skills, or wondering how to break into the industry? Flatiron School, WeWork's coding school, helps people pivot into tech careers. Flatiron School's on-campus and online immersive courses have a proven track record of impressive employment outcomes and include dedicated career coaching, employment support, and a money-back guarantee (see terms here). Some of its Texas grads have gotten jobs at JP Morgan Chase, National Oilwell Varco (NOV), iland Cloud, ScaleFactor, and Infosys.

Since its founding in 2012, Flatiron School has graduated thousands of students. Its software engineering and data science immersive programs each run for 15 weeks, and the school is committed to creating a more inclusive tech culture with the Women Take Tech and Diversity Initiatives. By creating community through conversations, Flatiron School has been able to provide scholarships for women through its partnerships with Lyft, Birchbox, and SeatGeek, as well as for people of color, military families, and the LGBTQ community.

Check out this list of upcoming events held at the WeWork Houston campus at 708 Main St., schedule a campus tour, or apply today.

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Building Houston

 
 

Molecule has closed new funding in order to focus on the energy transition. Photo via Getty Images

A Houston startup with a software-as-a-service platform for the energy transition has announced it closed a funding round with participation from a local venture capital.

Molecule closed its $12 million series A, and Houston-based Mercury Fund was among the company's investors. The company has a cloud-based energy trading and risk management solution for the energy industry and supports power, natural gas, crude/refined products, chemicals, agricultural commodities, softs, metals, cryptocurrencies, and more.

"We led the seed round of Molecule upon their formation and are excited to participate in their series A," says Blair Garrou, co-founder and managing director of Mercury, in a news release. "Molecule's success in the ETRM/CTRM industry, especially in relation to electricity and renewables, positions them as the company to beat for the energy transition in the 2020s."

The company will use its new funds to further build out its product as well as introduce offerings to manage renewables credits, according to the release.

"In 2020, we realized that electricity — the growth commodity of the 2020s — represented over half of Molecule's customer base, and we decided to double down," says Sameer Soleja, founder and CEO of Molecule, in the release. "We were also rated the No. 1 SaaS ETRM/CTRM vendor. With this fundraise, we have the fuel to become No. 1 SaaS platform for power and renewables, and then the market leader overall.

"Molecule is ready to power the energy transition," Soleja continues.

Molecule's last round of funding closed in November 2014. The $1.1 million seed round was supported by Mercury Fund and the Houston Angel Network.

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