Break the Code

How software salaries measure up across tech-savvy Texas cities

Flatiron School has graduated thousands of students since its founding in 2012. Photo courtesy of WeWork

Texas may not have the tech reputation of Silicon Valley or Seattle, but it's definitely making strides. Houston, Austin, Dallas, and San Antonio are rapidly growing into tech hubs, and the Lone Star State should absolutely make the shortlist if you're seeking a well-paying software engineer position.

According to job and salary websites Indeed and Glassdoor, both entry-level and senior-level software engineering salaries are competitive throughout the state. Web developer jobs in Texas are projected to grow 20 percent — compared to the national average of 15 percent — between 2016 and 2026.

Austin leads both levels in overall salary, but it's important to keep in mind that cost of living there is higher as well. Entry-level employees can expect to make an average of $69,342 while senior staffers can climb to $121,302.

Dallas is next, with junior workers bringing in $68,314 and senior developers making an average of $115, 212. Houston and San Antonio are pretty similar, offering engineers who are just starting out an average of $64,194 (H-town) and $65,596 (Alamo City) and more experienced workers $114,686 and $111,369, respectively.

Houston is the most populous city in Texas — and the fourth most in the nation — and that increases the demand for tech talent. While the city lost jobs in 2018, the number of tech job postings actually increased 140 percent year-over-year, based on a report by CompTIA. Software engineer/web developer employment increased 2.1 percent year-over-year in the same report, and are projected to grow 5.9 percent between 2018 and 2026.

Need to brush up your skills, or wondering how to break into the industry? Flatiron School, WeWork's coding school, helps people pivot into tech careers. Flatiron School's on-campus and online immersive courses have a proven track record of impressive employment outcomes and include dedicated career coaching, employment support, and a money-back guarantee (see terms here). Some of its Texas grads have gotten jobs at JP Morgan Chase, National Oilwell Varco (NOV), iland Cloud, ScaleFactor, and Infosys.

Since its founding in 2012, Flatiron School has graduated thousands of students. Its software engineering and data science immersive programs each run for 15 weeks, and the school is committed to creating a more inclusive tech culture with the Women Take Tech and Diversity Initiatives. By creating community through conversations, Flatiron School has been able to provide scholarships for women through its partnerships with Lyft, Birchbox, and SeatGeek, as well as for people of color, military families, and the LGBTQ community.

Check out this list of upcoming events held at the WeWork Houston campus at 708 Main St., schedule a campus tour, or apply today.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

Moonflower Farms grows lettuce hydroponically. Courtesy of Moonflower Farms

A Houston urban farm has earned national recognition for its innovative approach to water conservation. Moonflower Farms won the American Heart Association's Foodscape Innovation Excellence Award, which recognizes positive changes in the foodscape, a term for all of the places where food is produced, purchased, or consumed.

The Heart Association selected Moonflower's submission, titled "Sustainable Farming Through Water Conservation," from 26 entries. Dallas' Restorative Farms earns the Foodscape Innovation Consumer Choice Award.

"These two innovations demonstrate a way of producing food that promotes affordability and equitable access, and the American Heart Association is proud to recognize these efforts," AHA chief medical officer for prevention Eduardo Sanchez said in a release.

Located in a 20,000-square-foot greenhouse south of downtown, Moonflower operates what it describes as Houston's first vertical indoor farm. The method both reduces the amount of space needed to grow the farm's microgreens, lettuces, herbs and edible flowers and it eliminates the disruptions caused by adverse weather conditions, which allows the farm to produce year round.

Moonflower uses a closed-loop system for capturing rainwater to feed its crops. The water is treated and oxygenated so that it can be reused. Not having to pay for water from the City of Houston allows the farm to operate more economically and sell its produce at an affordable price to restaurants and individuals.

"Our hydroponic farm uses 90-percent less water than conventional farms," Moonflower founder and CEO Federico Marques said in a statement. "We provide year-round produce to residents in historically underserved communities and donate produce to local charitable food systems."

One of those charities is Houston non-profit Second Servings, which "rescues" food from restaurants and events and distributes it to food pantries and other resources.

"The donations we receive from Moonflower Farms are incredible," Second Servings founder and president Barbara Bronstein said. "Their hydroponically grown greens are so appreciated by the needy Houstonians we serve, who lack affordable, convenient access to fresh produce."

Recently, Moonflower introduced a SupaGreens subscription box that allows customers to purchase greens weekly, bimonthly, or monthly. The box is delivered directly to consumers.

------

This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Trending News