Start up at a low cost

Houston named among the most affordable cities for startups

Houston has affordablility going for its startups. Photo by Zview/Getty Images

Houston has been long known for its great quality of life and low cost of living, and a new study found that when it comes to startup companies specifically, the greater Houston area has a lot to offer.

Clever, a real estate tool and blog, identified Houston as the sixth best metro in the United States for affordability for startups. The study looked into startup density, investment, the education level of the local population, and the cost of living, and more within the top 50 most populated cities in the U.S.

The resulting ranking had all four of Texas' major metros in the top 10. Austin ranked No. 1 overall, Dallas-Fort Worth ranked at No. 3 (after Atlanta), and San Antonio-New Braunfels came in at No. 8. The study ranked each city based on its density of startups, its growth, investment in business, and its cost of living.

At No. 6 for growth, Houston ranked the highest out of its Texas counterparts, but San Antonio and Houston share the ranking of No. 6 for investment.

"Considering Houston's metro is tied with San Antonio's for the highest average investment in small business, and the proximity to great food, the Gulf of Mexico coast, and attractions like Minute Maid Park and the NASA Space Center, we would definitely suggest considering starting a business here," reads the report.

The Houston area touts a startup density of over 25 percent, which earns it 12th place in that particular category. The report finds that Houston has 6.89 million residents across 8,265.8 square miles and 6.54 percent of Houstonians work at a startup, while 2.8 percent are self employed.

When it comes to GDP and education, Houston has a lot of bragging rights. The Houston area's GDP is reported to be $490 billion, which is the 7th highest in the country, according to the Bureau of Economic Analysis.Meanwhile, almost a quarter of the region's population has a bachelor's degree or higher.

Last month, InnovationMap reported that Inc. 5000 named Houston among its hottest startup cities, citing the three-year revenue growth of Houston's companies that made it on to the Inc. 5000 list. Just before that ranking, Business Facilities magazine named Houston the fourth best startup ecosystem in the U.S., as well as the fourth best city for economic growth potential. Similarly, Commercial Cafe recently named Houston a top large city for early stage startups.

The Ion's accelerator program has pivoted to more prominately feature startups with resiliency solutions. Photo courtesy of The Ion

The Ion's accelerator program has taken the current COVID-19 outbreak as an opportunity to focus on resiliency. The Ion Smart and Resilient Cities Accelerator, as it's now known, will launch it's second cohort virtually at the end of the month.

"Resiliency has always been a core pillar of our accelerator — in my opinion, you really can't have a smart city unless you're a resilient city," Galib tells InnovationMap. "Language is so important to our culture, and we had not had that word in the accelerator, and so now we do."

The change is effective immediately and comes just ahead of the accelerator's second cohort, which will focus on air quality, water purification, and clean tech. Just like the first cohort, the selected startups will participate in a few months of programming — this time, all online — before entering into pilot programs with the city of Houston.

Later in this spring, the accelerator plans to call for remote education and online technologies. With schools closed, Galib says she's seen a need for tech optimization for both students and teachers.

"By harnessing smart technologies, cities become more resilient in the face of crises," says Gabriella Rowe, executive director of The Ion, in a news release. "The innovation of the Ion Smart & Resilient Cities Accelerator will empower and create the smart technology we need to keep our city's operations moving and our residents safe as we inevitably face sociological challenges and natural disasters. We are excited to play a role in improving our city's fabric and quality of life."

The first cohort resulted in a collective fifteen projects across nine startups. The program is backed by the city of Houston, Microsoft, Intel, and TXRX. The third cohort is expected to launch toward the end of 2020, and Galib says she's not sure what the focus will be yet.

"As we look toward the Ion's opening in January 2021, I look at the accelerator program and its capacity to accelerate entrepreneurship spirit," Galib says. "I truly see the next few months as a chance for us to double down on our efforts to find entrepreneurship everywhere in Houston so that we see every entrepreneur from all walks of life."