food for thought

2 big companies team up with Houston nonprofit to feed unemployed hospitality workers

Second Servings of Houston has amped up its cause to feed unemployed hospitality workers. Courtesy of Second Servings

Two companies have stepped up in a big way to help a local nonprofit distribute thousands of meals to unemployed hospitality workers who lost their jobs due to the coronavirus shutdown.

By partnering with energy company Hess Corporation and food distribution giant Sysco, Second Servings of Houston will distribute 10,000 meals each week to unemployed hospitality workers through its newly established the "Dinner's On Us" program.

Hess' staff prepares the meals, which are available both fresh and frozen, utilized ingredients supplied by Sysco. Designed to provide approximately eight servings, the meals consist of hearty, classic fare such as chicken 'n biscuits, red beans and rice, and penne pasta with sausage.

Meals are distributed every Tuesday and Thursday from 10 am to noon in the LAM parking lot at 702 Avenida De Las Americas. A drive-thru setup allows for contact-free distribution, and Second Servings volunteers wear masks and gloves. To receive a meal, people should demonstrate eligibility with a recent paystub from a restaurant, caterer, hotel, sports stadium, or other hospitality-related business.

Typically, Second Servings works with restaurants, hotels, caterers, and others to rescue surplus food that would otherwise go to waste; it is also the beneficiary of the 2020 CultureMap Tastemaker Awards. Now, the organization is aiding the people who usually assist its mission.

"We saw the impact first-hand last month, when we rescued valuable perishable food from hotels, event venues, business cafeterias, schools and restaurant kitchens that were forced to close," Second Servings founder Barbara Bronstein says in a statement. "We created this program because we wanted to help the people who serve the community and donate surplus food to us all year long."

Second Servings will continue the program for as long as it has the funding to do so. In addition to Hess an Sysco, sponsors include real estate firm BHW Capital, ACME Party & Tent Rental, and Mucasey & Associates Architects. Those interested in making a contribution to continue the program may do so via the Second Servings website.

The meal options include chicken and biscuits. Courtesy of Second Servings

------

This article originally ran on CultureMap.

Trending News

Building Houston

 
 

UH has found a way to instantly zap COVID-10. Andriy Onufriyenko/Getty Images

While the world rushes to find a COVID-19 vaccine, scientists from the University of Houston have found a way to trap and kill the virus — instantly.

The team has designed a "catch and kill" air filter that can nullify the virus responsible for COVID-19. Researchers reported that tests at the Galveston National Laboratory found 99.8 percent of the novel SARS-CoV-2 — which causes COVID-19 — was killed in a single pass through the filter.

Zhifeng Ren, director of the Texas Center for Superconductivity at UH, collaborated with Monzer Hourani, CEO of Medistar, a Houston-based medical real estate development firm, plus other researchers to design the filter, which is described in a paper published in Materials Today Physics.

Researchers were aware the virus can remain in the air for about three hours, which required a filter that could quickly remove it. The added pressure of businesses reopening created an urgency in controlling the spread of the virus in air conditioned spaces, according to UH.

Meanwhile, to scorch the virus — which can't survive above around 158 degrees Fahrenheit — researchers instilled a heated filter. By blasting the temperature to around 392 F, they were able to kill the virus almost instantly.

The filter also killed 99.9 percent of the anthrax spores, according to researchers.

A prototype was built by a local workshop and first tested at Ren's lab for the relationship between voltage/current and temperature; it then went to the Galveston lab to be tested for its ability to kill the virus. Ren says it satisfies the requirements for conventional heating, ventilation and air conditioning (HVAC) systems.

"This filter could be useful in airports and in airplanes, in office buildings, schools and cruise ships to stop the spread of COVID-19," said Ren, MD Anderson Chair Professor of Physics at UH and co-corresponding author for the paper, in a statement. "Its ability to help control the spread of the virus could be very useful for society."

Medistar executives are also proposing a desk-top model, capable of purifying the air in an office worker's immediate surroundings, Ren added.

Developers have called for a phased roll-out of the device, with a priority on "high-priority venues, where essential workers are at elevated risk of exposure — particularly schools, hospitals and health care facilities, as well as public transit environs such as airplanes."

The hope, developers add, is that the filter will protect frontline workers in essential industries and allow nonessential workers to return to public work spaces.

Trending News