progress report

Foreign investors bank on Houston as a hot commercial real estate market

Houston's market can expect more foreign investment. Photo via Getty Images

Houston is in the midst of a residential real estate "buying bonanza." Now, a new report reveals that the Bayou City is no slouch when it comes to commercial real estate, as well.

In a recent survey released by AFIRE, an industry group for real estate investors, Houston tied for No. 14 on the list of cities favored by foreign real estate investors. Last year, Houston sat at No. 12.

Elsewhere in Texas, foreign real estate investors favored Austin over any other U.S. city for buying property in 2021. Boston ranked second, with Dallas in third place. San Antonio tied for No. 15.

In this year's survey, foreign real estate investors chose apartment buildings as their favorite property type, with warehouses landing at No. 2.

Mike McDonald, vice chairman of commercial real estate services company Cushman & Wakefield, recently told The New York Times that Austin is "the hottest market in the country right now."

"Commercial transactions are likely to pick up in the second half of 2021 and in 2022 as more people get vaccinated, more businesses operate at higher capacity, personal leisure and business travel pick up, and consumer spending rises," the National Association of Realtors noted in a first-quarter report about Austin's commercial real estate market.

Speaking of the Capital City, this is the first time in the 30-year history of the AFIRE survey that a city as small population-wise as Austin has topped the list or even showed up in the top three. Twenty-three percent of those questioned in the survey put Austin in the No. 1 spot, and 33 percent ranked Austin first, second, or third.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Houston experts at the annual Pumps and Pipes event discussed the importance of open innovation. Photo courtesy of Houston Methodist

Open innovation, or the practice of sourcing new technologies and idea across institutions and industries, was top of mind at the annual Pumps & Pipes event earlier this week.

The event, which is put on by an organization of the same name every year, focuses on the intersection of the energy, health care, and aerospace industries. The keynote discussion, with panelists representing each industry, covered several topics, including the importance of open innovation.

If you missed the discussion, check out some key moments from the panel.

“If we want to survive as a city, we need to make sure we can work together.”

Juliana Garaizar of Greentown Labs. "From being competitive, we’ve become collaborative, because the challenges at hand in the world right now is too big to compete," she continues.

“The pace of innovation has changed.”

Steve Rader of NASA. He explains that 90 percent of all scientists who have ever lived are alive on earth today. “If you think you can do it all yourself — and just find all the latest technology yourself, you’re kidding yourself.”

“You can’t close the door. If you do, you’re closing the door to potential opportunities.”

— Michelle Stansbury, Houston Methodist. “If you think you can do it all yourself — and just find all the latest technology yourself, you’re kidding yourself.” She explains that there's an influx of technologies coming in, but what doesn't work now, might work later or for another collaborator. "I would say that health care as a whole hasn’t been very good at sharing all of the things we’ve been creating, but that’s not the case today," she explains.

“The thing that makes Houston great is the same thing that makes open innovation great: diversity.”

— Rader says, adding that this makes for a great opportunity for Houston.

“Some of our greatest innovations that we’ve had come from other industries — not from health tech companies.”

— Stansbury says. "I think that's the piece everyone needs to understand," she says. "Don't just look in your own industry to solve problems."

“Nobody knows what is the best technology — the one that is going to be the new oil."

— Garaizar says. “All of this is going to be a lot of trial and error," she continues. “We don’t have the luxury of time anymore.”

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