Join the club

New innovative dining club connects Houston young professionals to deals

EaterPass, aimed at local young professionals, helps diners score deals at local restaurants. Photo via EaterPass.com

Houstonians love to dine out. And they love being part of something, especially if it's something that gives them something. Houstonians, meet EaterPass.

It's the brainchild of Courtney Steinfeld, who describes it as "a hip, fun, local membership community." While her target audience is millennial young women, ages 24-34, membership is open to all. For an $8 monthly fee, EaterPass members get "Insider Pricing" at a host of participating restaurants, which translates to 20 percent off the total bill, including drinks.

"The Insider Pricing is available any time with the exception of happy hour or special events," said Steinfeld. "And we also offer Insider Perks. These are time-specific perks with even more value than 20 percent off. The best part is, members can choose Insider Pricing or Perks.

Some of the current perks include EaterPass members receiving happy hour pricing on drinks any time they visit the Original Ninfa's Uptown, or getting $5 pricing on a Field and Tides burger, a dozen oysters, draft beer or house Champagne at Field and Tides.

EaterPass is a month-to-month membership, and Steinfeld estimates that if members spend $40 at a partner restaurant, the membership essentially pays for itself.

She's curated a list of some of Houston's top restaurants, including BCK Kitchen, Blackbird Izakaya, Brennan's Houston, Bungalow Heights, Field & Tides, Helen Greek Heights, Helen Greek Rice Village, Kanaloa, Moxie's, the Original Ninfa's Uptown, On the Kirb, Poitin, Sweet Paris Highland Village, Shun, Tikila's, and Wicklow Heights. Also new to the mix are 8th Wonder Brewery, 8th Wonder Distillery, and La Grange.

Those who want to join can pay their membership fee online and get instructions on how to download the electronic membership card, which they show when they dine at participating restaurants.

"Our Partner list serves as an easy go-to guide," said Steinfeld. "So, we have to be choosy about who we invite in. My focus has been to grow the bar segment with recent additions such as Tikila's and La Grange, which will be available in early March. Now I am shifting back to expanding our food offerings. Barbecue and Italian options are my next focus."

Occasionally, Steinfeld says, EaterPass will host meetups at its partner restaurants, but the majority of the community's social engagement happens on Instagram.

"Members can find our latest news posted via our Instagram Stories," said Steinfeld, who also uses the platform for share news with members about announcements, gift card giveaways, and member features and tips.

Steinfeld has been passionate about growing the business and ensuring good food and drink fits for her clients.

She's also got a special one-month free deal for CultureMap readers. Use code VIP20 to sign up.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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