vroom, vroom

E-commerce company focused on car sales revs up for Houston expansion

New York City-based Vroom employs more than 900 people in the Houston area. Photo courtesy of Vroom

Vroom, an e-commerce platform for buying and selling used vehicles, is driving up its presence in the Houston area.

The publicly traded company recently established a "last-mile hub" in Stafford where Vroom workers will inspect, detail, and place temporary tags on all cars being delivered or picked up in Texas. The hub is expected to serve nearly 7.1 million motorists in more than 455 ZIP codes within a 75-mile radius.

New York City-based Vroom employs more than 900 people in the Houston area. Aside from the new hub, local employees work at the company's reconditioning center, executive offices, and Texas Direct Auto and Sell Us Your Car locations. The hub is housed within Vroom's 293,000-square-foot reconditioning center. The reconditioning center alone employs almost 400 people.

Leaders of the new hub include Mary Kay Wegner, Vroom's chief logistics officer, and John Piatak, vice president of transportation.

"As Vroom's business continues to grow, we're committed to investing in the Houston area, from expanding our physical footprint, to hiring more local workers, to offering new services for our valued customers," Wegner says in a news release.

In the Houston area, the number of vehicles purchased from Vroom surged 144.6 percent from the first half of 2020 to the first half of 2021, the company says. The number of vehicles sold to Vroom in the Houston area soared 624.4 percent during the same period.

In fiscal 2020, Vroom sold 34,488 cars, up 82 percent from the same period a year earlier. Last year, the company posted revenue of nearly $915.5 billion, up almost 56 percent from the previous year.

"As the used vehicle market continues to embrace the e-commerce model, we will continue to execute our plan and invest in scaling our business and improving our customer experience as we transform the market for buying and selling used vehicles," Vroom CEO Paul Hennessy said in a March news release.

Vroom, founded in 2013, debuted as a public company in June 2020. As a private company, Vroom scooped up $1.3 billion in funding.

Last month, Vroom agreed to buy auto lender United Auto Credit for $300 million. Newport Beach, California-based United Auto Credit specializes in auto loans for buyers with spotty credit records.

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Building Houston

 
 

Dream Harvest picked up funding to open a 100,000-square-foot indoor farming facility in Houston. Photo courtesy of Dream Harvest

Houston-based Dream Harvest Farming Co., which specializes in sustainably growing produce, has landed a $50 million investment from Orion Energy Partners to open a 100,000-square-foot indoor farming facility in Houston. The facility will enable the company to dramatically ramp up its operations.

The new facility, which will be built in Southwest Houston, is scheduled for completion in January 2023. Dream Harvest’s existing 7,500-square-foot facility in Southwest Houston supplies 45 Whole Foods stores in Texas, Oklahoma, Louisiana, and Arkansas, as well as Sweetgreen restaurants in Texas.

The company currently employs 25 people. With the addition of the 100,000-square-foot facility, Dream Harvest’s headcount will rise to 65.

Dream Harvest relies on wind-powered, year-round indoor vertical farming to generate 400 times the yield of an outdoor farm while using 95 percent less water and no pesticides.

“Because the vast majority of America’s produce is grown in California and has to be shipped over long distances, most of the country receives produce that is old, has a poor flavor profile, and a short shelf life — a major contributing factor to the more than 30 percent of fresh vegetables being discarded in the U.S. each year,” Dream Harvest says in a December 7 news release.

Zain Shauk, co-founder and CEO of Dream Harvest, says his company’s method for growing lettuce, baby greens, kale, mustards, herbs, collards, and cabbage helps cut down on food waste.

“Demand for our produce has far outpaced supply, an encouraging validation of our approach as well as positive news for our planet, which is facing the rising problem of food and resource waste,” Shauk says. “While we have the yields today to support our business, we are pleased to partner with Orion on this financing, which will enable us to greatly expand our production and increase access to our produce for many more consumers.”

Dream Harvest expects to expand distribution to more than 250 retail locations in 2022.

“Orion’s focus on sustainable infrastructure and deep experience in building large industrial facilities will be complementary to Dream Harvest’s impressive track record of being a reliable supplier to high-caliber customers by achieving consistent yields, food safety, and operational efficiencies … ,” says Nazar Massouh, co-managing partner and CEO of Orion Energy Partners, which has offices in Houston and New York City.

Other companies in the Orion Energy Partners portfolio include Houston-based Caliche Development Partners, Tomball-based Python Holdings, The Woodlands-based Evolution Well Services, Houston-based Produced Water Transfer, and Houston-based Tiger Rentals.

Zain Shauk is the co-founder and CEO of Dream Harvest. Photo courtesy of Dream Harvest

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