2021 Outlook

Deloitte IDs 3 tech trends that deserve a closer look in 2021

Focus on improving cybersecurity this year. Photo by Yuichiro Chino/Getty

While cloud computing and artificial intelligence continue to dominate the technology industry, edge computing is also making headlines.

Deloitte's vice chairman and US technology sector leader, Paul Silverglate, shares his perspectives on the advantages of processing data locally and how partnerships will play a key role in accelerating growth in the technology industry in 2021.

Right now, technology organizations should consider three key strategic opportunities, both to recover from the COVID-19 crisis and boldly position themselves to thrive in the future:

  1. Redoubling digital transformation efforts, with an emphasis on improving cloud infrastructure, data and analytics capabilities, cybersecurity, and business model transformation
  2. Reorienting and reskilling the workforce to optimize remote work capabilities and take full advantage of advanced technologies such as artificial intelligence (AI)
  3. Reexamining where and how manufacturing happens, with a focus on improving transparency, flexibility, and resiliency

Continue reading the full report on Deloitte's website to learn more about the tech industry trends, key actions to take, and critical questions to ask.

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Building Houston

 
 

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity. Photo via Getty Images

Three big businesses — Air Liquide, BASF, and Shell — have added their firepower to the effort to promote large-scale carbon capture and storage for the Houston area’s industrial ecosystem.

These companies join 11 others that in 2021 threw their support behind the initiative. Participants are evaluating how to use safe carbon capture and storage (CCS) technology at Houston-area facilities that provide energy, power generation, and advanced manufacturing for plastics, motor fuels, and packaging.

Other companies backing the CCS project are Calpine, Chevron, Dow, ExxonMobil, INEOS, Linde, LyondellBasell, Marathon Petroleum, NRG Energy, Phillips 66, and Valero.

Business and government leaders in the Houston area hope the region can become a hub for CCS activity.

“Large-scale carbon capture and storage in the Houston region will be a cornerstone for the world’s energy transition, and these companies’ efforts are crucial toward advancing CCS development to achieve broad scale commercial impact,” Charles McConnell, director of University of Houston’s Center for Carbon Management in Energy, says in a news release.

McConnell and others say CCS could help Houston and the rest of the U.S. net-zero goals while generating new jobs and protecting current jobs.

CCS involves capturing carbon dioxide from industrial activities that would otherwise be released into the atmosphere and then injecting it into deep underground geologic formations for secure and permanent storage. Carbon dioxide from industrial users in the Houston area could be stored in nearby onshore and offshore storage sites.

An analysis of U.S Department of Energy estimates shows the storage capacity along the Gulf Coast is large enough to store about 500 billion metric tons of carbon dioxide, which is equivalent to more than 130 years’ worth of industrial and power generation emissions in the United States, based on 2018 data.

“Carbon capture and storage is not a single technology, but rather a series of technologies and scientific breakthroughs that work in concert to achieve a profound outcome, one that will play a significant role in the future of energy and our planet,” says Gretchen Watkins, U.S. president of Shell. “In that spirit, it’s fitting this consortium combines CCS blueprints and ambitions to crystalize Houston’s reputation as the energy capital of the world while contributing to local and U.S. plans to help achieve net-zero emissions.”

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