COVID-19

Experts rank holiday activities that put Houston residents most at risk for COVID-19

COVID-19 cases are spiking — just in time for the holidays. The Texas Medical Association has released a different type of naughty and nice list. Photo courtesy of the CDC

The Texas Medical Association has released its COVID-19 holiday risk chart, a ranking of popular activities based on how likely one is to contract the novel coronavirus.

With infections spiking in Houston and across the country, the chart was updated from its original version with input from physicians on the TMA COVID-19 Task Force and the TMA Infectious Diseases Committee. Together, the group identified popular seasonal activities and the calculated the risk of spreading the virus.

"It's back! The TMA #COVID19 Task Force has developed a new version of our popular risk assessment chart to help you choose your activities wisely this holiday season," the Austin-based association said in a November 17 tweet accompanying the new chart.

Using a ranking of 1 to 10, the chart measures everything from viewing holiday lights with family in a car (1) to attending an outdoor public tree lighting ceremony (4) to celebrating New Year's Eve at a bar or club (10).

The chart also measures the thing we're perhaps most worried about during the holiday season: spending time with loved ones.

Based on the TMA risk chart (and pretty much all scientific experts), it's safer to only interact with your immediate household this year. Typical activities like decorating a gingerbread house with another household (4) or traveling by plane to visit family or friends (5) run a moderate risk, while taking photos with Santa (7), shopping in-person on Black Friday (8), and attending a large indoor celebration with singing (10) pose a moderate-to-high risk.

The Centers for Disease Control issued similar holiday guidelines on November 11, encouraging people to limit interactions with those outside their immediate household. If possible, host gatherings outside and keep all non-family members at least six feet apart.

Masks should be worn unless eating or drinking and especially when in airports, bus stations, train stations, gas stations, and rest stops.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

The new risk-based guideline chart has been updated with seasonal activites. Courtesy of Texas Medical Association

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Building Houston

 
 

Keep your eyes out for a new solar farm that will be constructed in Sunnyside in south Houston. Photo via Getty Images

Mayor Sylvester Turner and the city council have given the green light on a project that will convert a 240-acre former landfill in Sunnyside into a brownfield solar installation.

The public-private partnership with Sunnyside Energy LLC. received unanimous approval on a lease agreement that will move the project — which is a part of the City's Climate Action Plan and Complete Communities Initiative — forward.

"The Sunnyside landfill has been one of Houston's biggest community challenges for decades, and I am proud we are one step closer to its transformation," says Mayor Turner in a news release. "I thank the Sunnyside community because this project would not have come together without its support. This project is an example of how cities can work with the community to address long-standing environmental justice concerns holistically, create green jobs and generate renewable energy in the process."

The solar field, which is anticipated to be installed and working by the end of next year, will be able to power 5,000 homes and offset 120 million pounds of CO2 each year, according to the release.

"We applaud the actions of Mayor Turner and the City Council in taking this significant step," says Dori Wolfe, managing director of Sunnyside Energy LLC, in the release. "It is a strong vote of confidence for this impactful project. All members of the project team realize that this Sunnyside Solar facility will be an iconic statement in the rejuvenation of the community. We are grateful that Mayor Turner has given us his support."

The city's involvement with the company began in 2017 when Houston joined the C40 Reinventing Cities Competition – a global competition to promote sustainable energy projects. As a part of the competition and through the city's efforts on the initiative, powers at be selected the winning proposal from Wolfe Energy LLC, which formed Sunnyside Energy LLC to execute the urban solar farm project.

Per the lease agreement, the city of Houston owns the land and Sunnyside Energy will be the tenant responsible for permitting, construction, operation, and more.

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