COVID-19

Experts rank holiday activities that put Houston residents most at risk for COVID-19

COVID-19 cases are spiking — just in time for the holidays. The Texas Medical Association has released a different type of naughty and nice list. Photo courtesy of the CDC

The Texas Medical Association has released its COVID-19 holiday risk chart, a ranking of popular activities based on how likely one is to contract the novel coronavirus.

With infections spiking in Houston and across the country, the chart was updated from its original version with input from physicians on the TMA COVID-19 Task Force and the TMA Infectious Diseases Committee. Together, the group identified popular seasonal activities and the calculated the risk of spreading the virus.

"It's back! The TMA #COVID19 Task Force has developed a new version of our popular risk assessment chart to help you choose your activities wisely this holiday season," the Austin-based association said in a November 17 tweet accompanying the new chart.

Using a ranking of 1 to 10, the chart measures everything from viewing holiday lights with family in a car (1) to attending an outdoor public tree lighting ceremony (4) to celebrating New Year's Eve at a bar or club (10).

The chart also measures the thing we're perhaps most worried about during the holiday season: spending time with loved ones.

Based on the TMA risk chart (and pretty much all scientific experts), it's safer to only interact with your immediate household this year. Typical activities like decorating a gingerbread house with another household (4) or traveling by plane to visit family or friends (5) run a moderate risk, while taking photos with Santa (7), shopping in-person on Black Friday (8), and attending a large indoor celebration with singing (10) pose a moderate-to-high risk.

The Centers for Disease Control issued similar holiday guidelines on November 11, encouraging people to limit interactions with those outside their immediate household. If possible, host gatherings outside and keep all non-family members at least six feet apart.

Masks should be worn unless eating or drinking and especially when in airports, bus stations, train stations, gas stations, and rest stops.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

The new risk-based guideline chart has been updated with seasonal activites. Courtesy of Texas Medical Association

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Building Houston

 
 

This week's innovators to know roundup includes three experts within the tech transfer space in Houston. Photos courtesy

Editor's note: It's a very special edition of the Monday innovators to know series. On Wednesday, all three of today's innovators will join me and InnovationMap for a panel discussing technology transfer — the process in general, what resources are available within their institutions, IP and grant writing, and so much more. Read more about the panelists below and click here to register for the free event.

Ginny Torno, Administrative Director, Innovation and IT Clinical Systems at Houston Methodist

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Ginny Torno has a long career at Houston Methodist, including work within research. Now, she's leading innovation initiatives at the deployment level within the hospital's technology center. Torno can speak to both the research and the implementation done within innovation at Houston Methodist.

Hadi Ghasemi, co-founder of Elemental Coatings and Cullen associate professor in the department of mechanical engineering at the University of Houston

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Hadi Ghasemi is Cullen associate professor in the department of mechanical engineering at UH. His research interests are in nanotechnology, surface physics, and heat transfer.

In 2018, Ghasemi co-founded Elemental Coatings, formerly SurfEllent, an anti-icing and anti-scaling coatings that aims to make the many problems associated with ice and scale buildup a thing of the past.

Rashim Singh, co-founder of Sanarentero and a research assistant professor of pharmaceutics at the University of Houston College of Pharmacy

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Co-founder of Sanarentero, Rashim Singh is developing therapies for gut-related diseases and disorders. Focused on her company, Singh can speak to the drug discovery process, grant writing, and more within the pharmaceutical space.

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