Best of the Best

Houston energy leader earns spot among America's 50 best workplaces

ConocoPhillips is one of America's best employers. Photo courtesy of ConocoPhillips

A major Houston energy player is raking in the awards. Austin-based Indeed recently revealed its list of the top 50 workplaces in the U.S., and Houston-based ConocoPhillips is joined by two other Texas companies.

To identify these top-rated workplaces, Indeed's data team mined the 100 million employee reviews on its own website and analyzed those from companies also featured on this year's Fortune 500 list.

ConocoPhillips has been exploring and producing oil and natural gas since 1875 and maintains its secret to success lies in the mantra "it's not just what we do — it's how we do it." It lands at No. 35, with employees praising the work-life balance and noting how they feel valued and respected.

Coming in at No. 3, Southwest earned raves for its supportive and fun environment, competitive pay, flexible work schedule, and enviable benefits (including free travel). Founded in 1967, the world's largest low-cost carrier also ranked No. 11 on Fortune's list of world's most admired companies for 2019.

Once based in Aliso Viejo, California, construction and engineering giant Fluor Corp. moved its headquarters to Irving in 2006. It takes the No. 17 spot on Indeed's list, and also resides on the Fortune 500 list with a 2018 revenue of $19.2 billion and more than 53,000 employees worldwide.

California clinches the rest of the top five, with Adobe (San Jose), Facebook (Menlo Park), Live Nation (Beverly Hills), and Intuit (Mountain View) demonstrating how tech and entertainment continue to remain popular industries for eager employees.

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This story originally appeared on CultureMap.com.

It's not easy being green

Texas again ranks poorly for its energy efficiency

Texas has been deemed inefficient when it comes to energy. Photo courtesy of Thomas Miller/Breitling Energy

Despite some growth in the industry's regional job market, Texas fails to rise through the ranks of a national report on energy efficiency.

For the second year in a row, the Lone Star State has made the list of the states with the worst energy efficiency, according to a report for personal finance website, WalletHub. Last year, the state ranked No. 42 in the country; however, this year's study had Texas at No. 41 of the 48 states evaluated. Hawaii and Alaska were left out due to data restrictions.

The report, which was released just in time for National Energy Awareness Month, looked at consumer usage of home electricity, as well as oil and fuel for cars and trucks. According to the report, a United States family will spend around $2,000 annually on utilities — and heating and cooling makes up about half of that bill. On average in 2018, consumers spent another $2,109 on oil and fuel for their vehicles.

Adopting energy-efficient tools and practices could help reduce consumer cost by 25 percent for utilities and around $638 on the roads. Texas has seen a growth in the job market for positions relating to energy efficiency, according to a recent report. The number of energy-efficiency-oriented jobs across Texas rose by 5.3 percent last year to 162,816, according to the report, and energy-efficiency workers account for 17 percent of all energy workers in Texas, the report says.

Texas, with its hot climate and underdeveloped public transportation systems, scored only 36.48 total points on the WalletHub report, which is up slightly from last year's 33.34 points. The state ranked No. 36 on home energy efficiency and No. 45 for auto energy efficiency.

Texans drove over 270 billion miles last year and used over 20 billion gallons of gas, the second worst and worst rankings, respectively, among the states considered for this study.

While maybe the state isn't rising on this list of consumer energy efficiency yet, the state has seen great economic growth specifically in the wind energy industry. The American Wind Energy Association's annual report for 2018 shows the wind energy sector employs between 25,000 and 26,000 people in Houston and elsewhere in Texas, up from 24,000 to 25,000 in 2017, with the total investment in Texas wind energy projects sitting at a whopping $46.5 billion. More than one-fifth of wind energy jobs in the U.S. are located in Texas.

"Houston is actively working to grow this sector, so we hope people will seriously think of Houston when they think of renewables in this new era of energy," Davenport says at an April 9 news conference in Houston where the American Wind Energy Association released its 2018 state-of-the-industry report.