tech solutions

Houston tech company launches digital logistics platform to help coronavirus supply chain disruptions

Houston-based ChaiOne has launched a new tool that can help companies track supply chain delays resulting from COVID-19. Photo courtesy of ChaiOne

Houston-based ChaiOne recently announced the soft launch of Velostics, the "slack" for logistics that solve wait times and cash flow challenges in the supply chain and logistics industry. The digital logistics platform is set to aid the struggling supply chain as surging demands stretch suppliers, offering their platform free for 60 days.

The platform, aimed at making communication and execution of industrial shipments easier is one of ChaiOne's software service startups. The digital solutions provider for the energy, power, and industrial sectors is a leader in behavioral science-led solutions for logistics operations.

"At ChaiOne we have a history of helping Houstonians whenever disaster strikes," says CEO and founder, Gaurav Khandelwal. "We created a disaster connect app during Hurricane Harvey for free that connected people with the resources they need. Velostics by pure happenstance happened to be ready for situations like [the coronavirus] when there's a lot of parties that need to collaborate."

Velostics results in an improved cash cycle for clients, cutting a 90-day settlement down to one day, along with an overhead reduction that reduces costs and improves output along with error reduction. The digital platform is specially engineered to reduce waste while keeping the supply chain running efficiently.

"With Velostics everybody in the supply chain whether it's the carrier, the truck driver, the warehouse worker or the customer can all be on the same page and in the same system using the in-app messaging system and satellite locations to see where the shipment is in real-time," says Khandelwal.

Like many other companies and individuals, Velostics has not been left untouched by the fallout of the spread of the coronavirus. This year they were chosen by Plug and Play Tech Center as a keynote for the Agora track of CERA week, with the cancellation of the premier energy conference they were not able to roll out the platform to a large audience.

"It's definitely unfortunate, but the situation has been changing daily and it has resulted in new opportunities for Velostics," says Khandelwal.

Velostics uses machine learning algorithms to predict wait times, help customers utilize their assets and plan more efficiently. The benefits of the logistics platform focus on reducing wait times for industrial shippers, third-party logistics providers, and freight brokers.

Today, they find themselves using these tools to help the community. Along with offering their platform for free for 60 days, they will be partnering with the American Red Cross to aid health professionals get the medical gear they need.

"Like any startup, we have a hypothesis about how to improve the industry which we then test, says Khandelwal. "But when there's a need such as this one, the hypothesis goes out of the window because the market is changing rapidly. If we can do anything to help from a supply-chain perspective to help save lives, we are very much open to sharing ideas."

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Building Houston

 
 

Some 49 percent of Houston workers are burned out at work. Getty Images

Local workers who're especially dreading that commute or cracking open the laptop in the morning aren't alone. A new study reveals that nearly half of Houston laborers are more burned out on the job.

Some 49 percent of Bayou City residents report to be burned out at work, according to employment industry website Robert Half. That's significantly higher than last year, when only 37 percent reported burnout in a similar poll.

Meanwhile, more than one in four Houston workers (28 percent) say that they will not unplug from work when taking time off this summer.

Not surprisingly, American workers are ready for a vacation. Per a press release, the research also reveals:

  • One in four workers lost or gave up paid time off in 2020
  • One in three plans to take more than three weeks of vacation time this year

Elsewhere in Texas, the burnout is real. In Dallas, 50 percent of workers report serious burnout. More than a quarter — 26 percent — of Dallasites fear they won't disconnect from the office during summer vacation.

In fun-filled Austin, 45 percent of the workforce complain of burnout. Some 32 percent of Austinites feel they can unplug from work during the summer.

Fortunately for us, the most burned-out city in the U.S. isn't in the Lone Star State. That dubious title goes to the poor city of Charlotte, North Carolina, where 55 percent of laborers are truly worn out.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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