tech solutions

Houston tech company launches digital logistics platform to help coronavirus supply chain disruptions

Houston-based ChaiOne has launched a new tool that can help companies track supply chain delays resulting from COVID-19. Photo courtesy of ChaiOne

Houston-based ChaiOne recently announced the soft launch of Velostics, the "slack" for logistics that solve wait times and cash flow challenges in the supply chain and logistics industry. The digital logistics platform is set to aid the struggling supply chain as surging demands stretch suppliers, offering their platform free for 60 days.

The platform, aimed at making communication and execution of industrial shipments easier is one of ChaiOne's software service startups. The digital solutions provider for the energy, power, and industrial sectors is a leader in behavioral science-led solutions for logistics operations.

"At ChaiOne we have a history of helping Houstonians whenever disaster strikes," says CEO and founder, Gaurav Khandelwal. "We created a disaster connect app during Hurricane Harvey for free that connected people with the resources they need. Velostics by pure happenstance happened to be ready for situations like [the coronavirus] when there's a lot of parties that need to collaborate."

Velostics results in an improved cash cycle for clients, cutting a 90-day settlement down to one day, along with an overhead reduction that reduces costs and improves output along with error reduction. The digital platform is specially engineered to reduce waste while keeping the supply chain running efficiently.

"With Velostics everybody in the supply chain whether it's the carrier, the truck driver, the warehouse worker or the customer can all be on the same page and in the same system using the in-app messaging system and satellite locations to see where the shipment is in real-time," says Khandelwal.

Like many other companies and individuals, Velostics has not been left untouched by the fallout of the spread of the coronavirus. This year they were chosen by Plug and Play Tech Center as a keynote for the Agora track of CERA week, with the cancellation of the premier energy conference they were not able to roll out the platform to a large audience.

"It's definitely unfortunate, but the situation has been changing daily and it has resulted in new opportunities for Velostics," says Khandelwal.

Velostics uses machine learning algorithms to predict wait times, help customers utilize their assets and plan more efficiently. The benefits of the logistics platform focus on reducing wait times for industrial shippers, third-party logistics providers, and freight brokers.

Today, they find themselves using these tools to help the community. Along with offering their platform for free for 60 days, they will be partnering with the American Red Cross to aid health professionals get the medical gear they need.

"Like any startup, we have a hypothesis about how to improve the industry which we then test, says Khandelwal. "But when there's a need such as this one, the hypothesis goes out of the window because the market is changing rapidly. If we can do anything to help from a supply-chain perspective to help save lives, we are very much open to sharing ideas."

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Building Houston

 
 

Vanessa Wyche, director of the Johnson Space Center, gave the keynote address at this year's State of Space event. Screenshot via houston.org

Is the Space City poised to continue its reign as an innovative hub for space exploration? All signs point to yes, according to a group of experts.

The Greater Houston Partnership hosted its annual State of Space this week. The virtual event featured a keynote address from Vanessa Wyche, director of NASA Johnson Space Center, and a panel moderated by David Alexander, chair of aerospace and aviation committee at the GHP and the director of the Rice Space Institute.

The conversations focused on the space innovation activity happening in Houston, as well as an update on the industry as a whole has space commercialization continues to develop. All the speakers addressed how Houston has what it takes to remain a hub for the sector.

"The future looks very bright for Houston that we will remain a leader in Houston spaceflight," Wyche says in her address.

Here are a few other memorable moments from the event.

"Houston, I feel, is poised to be a leader. We have led in human space flight, and we will a leader in commercialization."

— Wyche says in her keynote address, which gave a thorough overview of what all NASA is working on at JSC. She calls out specifically how startups are a driving force in commercialization. JSC is working with local accelerator programs at The Ion and MassChallenge.

"These startups help us to connect to tomorrow's space innovation leaders, and gives our team the opportunity to mentor these entrepreneurs as we work to advance both our scientific and technical knowledge," she says.

"The ability to have a place where government, academia, and industry can come together and share ideas and innovation is incredibly powerful."

​— Steve Altemus, president and CEO of Intuitive Machines LLC, specifically talking about the Houston Spaceport, where Intuitive Machines has signed on as a tenant. Altemus adds that a major key to leading space commercialization is a trained workforce, which the spaceport is focused on cultivating.

"We shouldn't discount the character that Houston has from the standpoint as a great place to build a business."

— Tim Kopra, vice president of robotics and space at MDA Ltd., says, adding that Houston is a big city that feels like a small town. "We need to incentivize companies to come and stay," he says.

"Great cities — like great companies — understand that if you're still, you're probably moving backwards. ... I think Houston gets it in that regard."

— Todd May, senior vice president of science and space at KBR, says, adding that Houston realizes it needs to be on the offensive side to bring innovation to the game, positioning the city very well for the future.

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