tech solutions

Houston tech company launches digital logistics platform to help coronavirus supply chain disruptions

Houston-based ChaiOne has launched a new tool that can help companies track supply chain delays resulting from COVID-19. Photo courtesy of ChaiOne

Houston-based ChaiOne recently announced the soft launch of Velostics, the "slack" for logistics that solve wait times and cash flow challenges in the supply chain and logistics industry. The digital logistics platform is set to aid the struggling supply chain as surging demands stretch suppliers, offering their platform free for 60 days.

The platform, aimed at making communication and execution of industrial shipments easier is one of ChaiOne's software service startups. The digital solutions provider for the energy, power, and industrial sectors is a leader in behavioral science-led solutions for logistics operations.

"At ChaiOne we have a history of helping Houstonians whenever disaster strikes," says CEO and founder, Gaurav Khandelwal. "We created a disaster connect app during Hurricane Harvey for free that connected people with the resources they need. Velostics by pure happenstance happened to be ready for situations like [the coronavirus] when there's a lot of parties that need to collaborate."

Velostics results in an improved cash cycle for clients, cutting a 90-day settlement down to one day, along with an overhead reduction that reduces costs and improves output along with error reduction. The digital platform is specially engineered to reduce waste while keeping the supply chain running efficiently.

"With Velostics everybody in the supply chain whether it's the carrier, the truck driver, the warehouse worker or the customer can all be on the same page and in the same system using the in-app messaging system and satellite locations to see where the shipment is in real-time," says Khandelwal.

Like many other companies and individuals, Velostics has not been left untouched by the fallout of the spread of the coronavirus. This year they were chosen by Plug and Play Tech Center as a keynote for the Agora track of CERA week, with the cancellation of the premier energy conference they were not able to roll out the platform to a large audience.

"It's definitely unfortunate, but the situation has been changing daily and it has resulted in new opportunities for Velostics," says Khandelwal.

Velostics uses machine learning algorithms to predict wait times, help customers utilize their assets and plan more efficiently. The benefits of the logistics platform focus on reducing wait times for industrial shippers, third-party logistics providers, and freight brokers.

Today, they find themselves using these tools to help the community. Along with offering their platform for free for 60 days, they will be partnering with the American Red Cross to aid health professionals get the medical gear they need.

"Like any startup, we have a hypothesis about how to improve the industry which we then test, says Khandelwal. "But when there's a need such as this one, the hypothesis goes out of the window because the market is changing rapidly. If we can do anything to help from a supply-chain perspective to help save lives, we are very much open to sharing ideas."

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Building Houston

 
 

Houston experts at the annual Pumps and Pipes event discussed the importance of open innovation. Photo courtesy of Houston Methodist

Open innovation, or the practice of sourcing new technologies and idea across institutions and industries, was top of mind at the annual Pumps & Pipes event earlier this week.

The event, which is put on by an organization of the same name every year, focuses on the intersection of the energy, health care, and aerospace industries. The keynote discussion, with panelists representing each industry, covered several topics, including the importance of open innovation.

If you missed the discussion, check out some key moments from the panel.

“If we want to survive as a city, we need to make sure we can work together.”

Juliana Garaizar of Greentown Labs. "From being competitive, we’ve become collaborative, because the challenges at hand in the world right now is too big to compete," she continues.

“The pace of innovation has changed.”

Steve Rader of NASA. He explains that 90 percent of all scientists who have ever lived are alive on earth today. “If you think you can do it all yourself — and just find all the latest technology yourself, you’re kidding yourself.”

“You can’t close the door. If you do, you’re closing the door to potential opportunities.”

— Michelle Stansbury, Houston Methodist. “If you think you can do it all yourself — and just find all the latest technology yourself, you’re kidding yourself.” She explains that there's an influx of technologies coming in, but what doesn't work now, might work later or for another collaborator. "I would say that health care as a whole hasn’t been very good at sharing all of the things we’ve been creating, but that’s not the case today," she explains.

“The thing that makes Houston great is the same thing that makes open innovation great: diversity.”

— Rader says, adding that this makes for a great opportunity for Houston.

“Some of our greatest innovations that we’ve had come from other industries — not from health tech companies.”

— Stansbury says. "I think that's the piece everyone needs to understand," she says. "Don't just look in your own industry to solve problems."

“Nobody knows what is the best technology — the one that is going to be the new oil."

— Garaizar says. “All of this is going to be a lot of trial and error," she continues. “We don’t have the luxury of time anymore.”

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