fresh funding

Houston-founded unicorn closes $240M round of funding led by Dallas firm

Cart.com, a Houston-founded unicorn ecommerce company, has closed its latest round of funding. Photo via cart.com

Cart.com, which moved its headquarters from Houston to Austin in December but still maintains a local presence, just landed $240 million in equity and debt funding.

Legacy Knight Capital Partners, the equity investment arm of the Legacy Knight Multifamily Office, led the equity round, with participation from Citi Ventures, Visa, and other Fortune 100 companies. J.P. Morgan and TriplePoint Capital provided the debt financing. Since being founded in 2020, Cart.com has secured $380 million in funding.

“What [CEO Omair Tariq] and the team at Cart.com have accomplished in the last 14 months is nothing short of remarkable. They have proven they have the ability to rapidly execute on their vision of building the first fully end-to-end e-commerce platform at massive scale,” David Sawyer, chief operating officer and managing partner of Legacy Knight, says in a news release.

Legacy Knight has offices in Houston and Dallas. On its website, Legacy Knight Capital Partners says it makes direct investments of $10 million to $50 million in growth-stage companies and real estate projects.

“With this new funding,” Tariq says, “we’re poised to continue our strategy of acquiring top providers from across the e-commerce value chain, while staying hyper-focused on meeting the evolving needs of the brands we serve.”

Cart.com recently acquired Dallas-based FB Flurry, a provider of technology for fulfillment and customer care, and SellerActive, a Tigard, Oregon-based provider of multichannel e-commerce software.

Omair Tariq, CEO of Cart.com Omair Tariq's Cart.com raised a big round last week. Photo via Cart.com

“The Cart.com team is building a platform that can help sellers of all sizes grow faster as the future of commerce becomes increasingly digital,” says Rubail Birwadker, senior vice president of global digital partnerships at Visa.

Cart.com supplies a variety of software and services for more than 2,000 online merchants.

Last year, the startup decided to relocate its headquarters to Austin, citing the city’s rise as an alternative to Silicon Valley and as “the country’s most exciting and fertile space for high-tech innovation.”

Furthermore, Cart.com said the relocation would help the startup by being in the same business ecosystem as Austin-based companies such as Whole Foods, YETI, Kendra Scott, Tito’s Handmade Vodka, Bumble, and Tecovas.

Cart.com’s move coincided with the startup being named Startup of the Year by Capital Factory, an Austin-based startup accelerator that has offices in Houston, Dallas, and San Antonio. Capital Factory is an investor in Cart.com.

Cart.com employs more than 850 people.

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Building Houston

 
 

A new report says Houston “is poised for further growth” in life sciences. Photo via Getty Images

Houston is receiving more kudos for its robust life sciences sector.

Bayou City lands at No. 13 in JLL’s 2022 ranking of the country’s top 15 metro areas for life sciences. JLL says Houston “is poised for further growth” in life sciences.

Here’s how Houston fares in each of the ranking’s three categories:

  • No. 12 for supply of life sciences-oriented commercial real estate
  • No. 14 for access to life sciences talent
  • No. 15 for life sciences grant funding and venture capital

Earlier this year, Houston scored a 13th-place ranking on a list released by JLL competitor CBRE of the country’s top 25 life sciences markets. Meanwhile, commercial real estate platform CommercialCafe recently placed Houston at No. 10 among the top U.S. metros for life sciences.

JLL applauds Houston for strong growth in the amount of life sciences talent along with “an impressive base of research institutions and medical centers.” But it faults Houston for limited VC interest in life sciences startups and a small inventory of lab space.

“Houston is getting a boost [in life sciences] from the growing Texas Medical Center and an influx of venture capital earmarked for life sciences research,” the Greater Houston Partnership recently noted.

Boston appears at No. 1 in this year’s JLL ranking, followed by the San Francisco Bay Area, San Diego, Washington, D.C./Baltimore, and Philadelphia.

Last year’s JLL list included only 10 life sciences markets; Houston wasn’t among them.

“The long-term potential of the sector remains materially unchanged since 2021,” Travis McCready, head of life sciences for JLL’s Americas markets, says in a news release.

“Innovation is happening at a more rapid pace than ever before, the fruits of research into cell and gene therapy are just now being harvested, and revenue growth has taken off in the past five years as the sector becomes larger, an atypical growth track.”

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