funding focused

Exclusive: 2 serial entrepreneurs launch Houston startup incubator

Brad Jenkins and Austin Hill have announce the launch of a growth and invetment-focused incubator for startups called Seed Round Capital. Photos courtesy of Seed Round Capital

Two Houstonians with years of entrepreneurial and investing experience are starting a firm focused on advising and growing local technology startups.

Brad Jenkins and Austin Hill have announced the launch of Seed Round Capital, an investment and advisory firm based in Houston and for Houston-based startups. Rather than an accelerator model, the new firm will focus on long-term support for its portfolio companies.

"Our program helps startup founders fund and scale their businesses with management guidance from seasoned entrepreneurs. In addition, founders receive training on proven business methods specially formulated by Seed Round Capital, and access to funding," Hill says in a statement to InnovationMap.

Startups can apply online to be selected to receive mentoring from Jenkins, Hill, and a network of experts involved in — or previously involved in — Entrepreneurs' Organization (EO), a local group of business leaders. Once selected, Seed Round's startups will have access to office space at The Cannon.

"Because we recognize that every new business is unique in its journey, we are able to customize mentoring to suit each startup. Our expertise helps startups reduce risk, secure funding and grow faster than if they were doing this on their own," Jenkins says.

Jenkins has 25 years of software and technology startup experience and has served on the Houston board of EO. A Texas A&M University alumnus, he has a background in marketing and computer science. Hill's specialty includes distribution, contracting, real estate, and consumer-packaged goods. A University of Texas and West Point graduate, he won Rice University's Veterans Business Battle competition and organizes the EO's accelerator program.

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Building Houston

 
 

With this new joint effort, Syzygy is one step closer to commercial scale of its decarbonization technology. Photo courtesy of Syzygy

A Houston tech company has joined forces with a nonprofit to test a new sustainable fuel production process.

The project is a joint effort from Houston-based Syzygy Plasmonics and nonprofit research institute RTI International and sponsored by Equinor Ventures and Sumitomo Corporation of Americas. Based in the RTI facility in Research Triangle Park, North Carolina, the six-month pilot is testing a way to convert two potent greenhouse gases — carbon dioxide (CO2) and methane (CH4) — into low-carbon-intensity fuels, which have the potential to replace petroleum-based jet fuel, diesel, and gasoline.

"This demonstration will be the first of its kind and represents a disruptive step in carbon utilization. The sustainable fuels produced are expected to quickly achieve cost parity with today's fossil fuels," says Syzygy CEO Trevor Best in a news release. "Integrating our technology with RTI's Fischer-Tropsch synthesis system has the potential to significantly reduce the carbon intensity of shipping, trucking, and aviation without requiring major fleet modifications."

According to Syzygy, the pilot is a step toward being able to scale the process to a commercial-ready Syzygy e-fuels plant.

"By making minor adjustments in the process, we also expect to produce sustainable methanol using the same technology," Best continues.

An independent research institute, RTI International's focus is on improving the human condition. The multidisciplinary nonprofit seeks to support science-based solutions like Syzygy's technology, which has already proven its scale-up capabilities in earlier testing.

Through the partnership, RTI will assist Syzygy with process design and systems integration for the pilot-scale demonstration. Once it reaches commercial scale, the technology is expected to turn millions of tons of CO2 per year to produce sustainable fuels.

"We are excited about the opportunity to collaborate with Syzygy to test and assist in the scale-up of this promising technology," says Sameer Parvathikar, Ph.D., the director of the Renewable Energy and Energy Storage program in RTI's Technology Advancement and Commercialization business unit. "This work aligns with our capabilities, our goals of helping de-risk and commercialize novel technologies, and our vision to address the world's most critical problems with science-based solutions."

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