nailed it

Texas entrepreneur brings on-demand nail service to Houston

Dallasite Amber Venz Box has brought Cherry the Bayou City. Photo courtesy of Cherry

Ladies, take note: A Dallas-based on-demand nail service app, Cherry, has expanded to Houston. Founded by Amber Venz Box, the blogger/influencer-turned tech entrepreneur, the convenient, at-home service is now available in 37 ZIP codes.

"The nod was that the Cherry on top is the convenience the app provides to women who want to have it all — a career, a family, and a mani nearly impossible with a salon model," Venz Box tells CultureMap.

Women in Dallas and Austin have been booking a Cherry since 2017 and the plans for continued expansion are underway, Cherry CEO Aaron Coats says in a statement. A representative from the brand notes that Cherry will be available in Spring and The Woodlands this October.

When you book a Cherry, a local, licensed nail technician is at your door as soon as two hours. The waterless services are available daily, from 9 am to 8:30 pm Choose from a classic, gel, or dip manicure or a gel, classic, or men's pedicure. All payments are made through the app.

A Cherry is more than just a manicure or pedicure. The LIKEtoKNOW.it and rewardStyle founder launched Cherry to empower women to create flexible work schedules and have financial independence. "By choosing Cherry, you are giving economic opportunity to women in your own community - proximate to you," Venz Box says.

The app is free to download on the App Store.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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Building Houston

 
 

Some 49 percent of Houston workers are burned out at work. Getty Images

Local workers who're especially dreading that commute or cracking open the laptop in the morning aren't alone. A new study reveals that nearly half of Houston laborers are more burned out on the job.

Some 49 percent of Bayou City residents report to be burned out at work, according to employment industry website Robert Half. That's significantly higher than last year, when only 37 percent reported burnout in a similar poll.

Meanwhile, more than one in four Houston workers (28 percent) say that they will not unplug from work when taking time off this summer.

Not surprisingly, American workers are ready for a vacation. Per a press release, the research also reveals:

  • One in four workers lost or gave up paid time off in 2020
  • One in three plans to take more than three weeks of vacation time this year

Elsewhere in Texas, the burnout is real. In Dallas, 50 percent of workers report serious burnout. More than a quarter — 26 percent — of Dallasites fear they won't disconnect from the office during summer vacation.

In fun-filled Austin, 45 percent of the workforce complain of burnout. Some 32 percent of Austinites feel they can unplug from work during the summer.

Fortunately for us, the most burned-out city in the U.S. isn't in the Lone Star State. That dubious title goes to the poor city of Charlotte, North Carolina, where 55 percent of laborers are truly worn out.

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This article originally ran on CultureMap.

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