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Accenture to double the size of its Houston innovation hub

Accenture is building out the floor that houses its Houston innovation hub in order to accomodate for its growing client base and staff. Courtesy of Accenture

When Brian Richards, managing director at Accenture, launched the company's Houston innovation hub, he had a team of about a half dozen and 13,500 square feet of space. Now, his crew has surpassed a hundred people, and it's about time the hub's space grows as well.

Accenture is building out the rest of the floor the hub currently resides on. After this process, which is currently ongoing, the hub will be nearly 30,000 square feet.

"Since we've launched, we've been fully booked," Richards tells InnovationMap. "We've had more than 400 workshops with various companies — from both here in Houston and globally."

The first phase of the expansion will allow for Richards and his team to better provide clients — usually large companies — with their services, which is everything from current design thinking to software development services. Construction is expected to be completed later this year.

However, the second phase of this growth project includes the creation of Houston's ICS Cyber Fusion Center to address Accenture clients' growing demand for cybersecurity within industrial capabilities. Currently, the timeline for phase two has not been defined, Richards says.

Accenture's Houston innovation hub hosts its clients with workshops that allow for strategic brainstorming for innovative solutions to problems occurring at the company or within the industry. Most of the hub's clients are within the energy industry. After identifying the problems and coming up with solutions, the hub's team members are able to offer engineering and design services from prototypes to scaling up and implementation, even passing off the client to Accenture's wider scope of services.

"It's a strong recognition of how digital innovation continues to thrive here in Houston and the role Accenture has had in helping develop that ecosystem and supporting it through the innovation hub," Richards says.

Accenture's Houston innovation hub regularly hosts business executives for workshops that allow for hands-on digital technology discovery.Courtesy of Accenture

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This week's roundup of Houston innovators includes Gaurab Chakrabarti of Solugen, Sandy Guitar of HX Venture Fund, and Cameron Owen of rBIO. Photos courtesy

Editor's note: In this week's roundup of Houston innovators to know, I'm introducing you to three local innovators across industries — from synthetic biology to venture capital — recently making headlines in Houston innovation.

Gaurab Chakrabarti, the CEO and co-founder of Solugen

Gaurab Chakrabarti shared his entrepreneurial journey on the SXSW stage this year. Photo courtesy of the Greater Houston Partnership

Houston doesn't have too many unicorns — startups valued at $1 billion or more — in its innovation ecosystem, but Solugen, a sustainable chemicals company, is among the elite group. Gaurab Chakrabarti, the CEO and co-founder of the company, joined Houston House by the Greater Houston Partnership, to share his story on the SXSW stage.

“You do make your own luck, but you have to be putting in the work to do it," Chakrabarti says, adding that it's not an easy thing to accomplish. “There are things you can be doing to increase your luck surface area."

He shared several lessons he learned on his founder journey in the discussion. Read more.

Sandy Guitar, managing director of HX Venture Fund

Sandy Guitar shares some lessons learned from the fallout of Silicon Valley Bank. Photo via HXVF

Following the failure of Silicon Valley Bank, there's one thing Sandy Guitar can say has changed for Houston innovators: Bank diversification is going to be a must.

“We didn't think we needed one last week, but this week we know we need a resilience plan," she says, explaining that bank diversification is going to be added to "the operational due diligence playbook." Read more.

Cameron Owen, co-founder and CEO of rBIO

San Diego-based rBIO moved to Houston to take advantage of the growing ecosystem of biomanufacturing and synthetic biology. Photo courtesy of rBIO

Founded in San Diego, rBIO recently relocated to Houston and has big plans for settling in the city, says Cameron Owen, the company's co-founder and CEO.

“Companies from California like us and the coastal areas were converging here in Houston and creating this new type of bioeconomy,” he tells InnovationMap.

He shares that Houston wasn't originally on his radar, until it was. A visit turned into a relocation, and it's just the beginning for the biotech startup that's focused on using synthetic biology for pharmaceuticals. Read more.

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